A good majority of web developers view the domain flipping industry with disdain as they face a hard time finding the right domain names for their own development projects. Domain flipping is also looked down upon by corporate and business entities who register multiple domains related to their trademarks or business names. Actually, it is these people who’re the real domain name squatters!
HIM: "Mainly small-medium sized local businesses looking for a way to increase their ranking. Most already have a branded domain in place, and have heard that using a keyword domain can help. Or they have seen a competitor ranking using that method. The problem I face is that they don't have a lot of money to spend, so I get lowballed on the asking price. There have been a few that make a ton of profit vs what I purchased it for, but that boils down to luck: what is for sale, when I find it, things like that."
The market-driven principles of the domain trade mean that a domain is only worth as much as the buyer is willing to pay. It is for this reason that criteria such as market potential and usability play such central roles in determining prices. Values can change at the drop of a hat. The price of a domain that was once of little interest to anyone in years past can skyrocket once, for example, a newly founded company takes interest in that same name.
Hi Kulwant, these are great tips as usual. I particularly like the way to tell us to check the google pagerank in case the domain has been banned – that could lower the usefulness of the domain quite a bit. One thing though, don’t you think that buying domains is sometimes immoral? Like sometimes you accidentally buy a domain of somebody elses website who forgot to renew.
Domain grabbing and cybersquatting are often used as synonyms, but there is a slight difference between the two. The former is a term for perfectly legitimate domain trading, whereas cybersquatting damages name rights and trademark laws and usually leads to disputes in court. We explain the difference and what trademark infringement can mean for you.

GoDaddy offers a variety of benefits when you choose to buy or sell your domain with us. We have a unique Auction bidder verification process that protects both buyers and sellers from any kind of fraudulent activity. We also offer a handy Investor mobile app that allows you to watch auctions in real time and view their history (including number of bidders and how much they bid), all from the convenience of your smartphone.
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What about option #4 - Redirect your existing domain to the old domain? I bought an old domain that is 100% relevant to my current domain but currently has with very little content. It did have more content fours years ago. The old domain is 13 years old, pr=3, while my current is 7 months old pr=1 and a decent amount of content. The old domain I purchased was not expired though and I do not know if this makes a difference. What are the pros and cons of option #4? Am I correct to think that option #1 would result in no benefit from the old domain's age value and if so why is it not listed as a con, a MAJOR one. Its hard to believe that a 301 using option 1 would give my existing domain 13 years credit but I'll take it if it does.
The "Domain Lists" and the "TLDs" filter are now static and not created dynamic based on the current search. Turns out creating these 2 filters dynamically was slowing down the search tremendously. It even made certain requests impossible. For example now you can do a dot search that affects all .com domains and get a result with over 150mio domains in reasonable time. I'm also working on a new search cluster that will make searching even faster (not released yet).
Domain flipping is the art of buying a good domain name at a wholesale price and successfully selling it at a resale price and making a profit. I’ve been helping clients flip domain names for over 10 years. The skills needed to be successful is some working capital, knowledge of domain valuations and a good information flow from a trustworthy domain broker who knows the landscape and can help source you the best deals.

If you know how to get websites to page one, why are you not marketing that fact to potential clients and consumers or would-be domain purchasers? Trying to get a keyword driven domain to rank high and sell it off for a profit isn't a good investment, either time wise or for the long-term success of your company. Instead, use sites that you have already ranked high as an example of how awesome you are and sign them up for a monthly fee, rather than trying to sell them a "make money now" domain.
Control your expectations and keep them based on facts, data and expert opinions. Use a tool like EstiBot to get a general idea of how much the domain may be worth. Do understand that this is an automated appraisal tool, so take those numbers with a grain of salt. However, it’s great to get you started. You can also use paid, human-based appraisal services from Sedo and other providers, but these can get costly. If you’re not careful, you could easily overspend on such services and then realize your domain may not even be worth the appraisal fee.
A good majority of web developers view the domain flipping industry with disdain as they face a hard time finding the right domain names for their own development projects. Domain flipping is also looked down upon by corporate and business entities who register multiple domains related to their trademarks or business names. Actually, it is these people who’re the real domain name squatters!

Here’s what you DON’T want to do: Target prospective buyers based on their perceived economic status, without any insight into the industry you’re targeting. “Lawyers seem to do well,” you think, “maybe I should start selling names to them.” So you rush out and buy a bunch of domain names you think would appeal to the law firms you’ve identified as potential buyers. Without knowledge of the space, you may not know that the American Bar Association and other industry-specific organizations set rules that govern some aspects of legal advertising. You’re not going to strike gold selling names your target buyers can’t use.
When I first started online, I'd register domains that I thought I could develop and sell at a later time. After learning my way around the cloud, I realized many of the domains I'd registered are pretty much useless, or so I thought, and I let them expire. Come to find out several of these domains have been picked up by parking sites and are being offered for sale for thousands of dollars! Now I'm not saying they're actually selling for the asking price, but I learned my lesson. I never allow a domain name to expire. I add content to it, backlinks, some AdSense and try to sell it for something.
Your system is broken, You took my lising money on an open domain http://www.australianfintech.com.au and then stuffed me around something cronic and no response from your supoport team either. I have spoken to Tony who is one of the main people there at a function and I will move heaven and earth to find his number and give him a piece of my mind!! I have 60+ domains to sell but it seems you do not want the business! BAD MOVE not accomodating clients!
There are many different ways to make money in the Domain Name game, but rather than skim over half a dozen of them at no great depth, Buffet takes a detailed look at Domain Flipping, one of the simplist and most effective ways to make money online. He lays out a step by step plan to guide you through the process, as well as a list of free resources that are invaluable.
Simply put, domain flipping is the process of acquiring a domain name with a motive of selling it at a higher cost to someone else. This is very similar to flipping houses or cars, the only difference being that you can’t do much to increase the value of the asset by ‘fixing it up’ and then turning it over for a quick buck. Acquiring a valuable domain name before it is tagged with a premium price is the key to a successful domain flip. Raymond Hackney, a domain investor and consultant, successfully flipped a .website domain (his first on a new domain extension) for a decent profit. Read all about it here.
So how do you develop that instinct? NameBio maintains a database of over 500,000 historical domain sales (as of writing this post). They have interesting filtering features by which you can narrow down domains by price range, date sold, keywords and more. Simply sifting through the listings on NameBio long enough will quickly develop your domain appraisal “instinct”.
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