The market-driven principles of the domain trade mean that a domain is only worth as much as the buyer is willing to pay. It is for this reason that criteria such as market potential and usability play such central roles in determining prices. Values can change immediatly and without any warning. The price of a domain that was once of little interest to anyone in years past can skyrocket once, for example, a newly founded company takes interest in that same name.
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Unfortunately, you probably won't like my tips. You need to look for quality domains at a good price and be willing to hold on to them to get your money back or know when you've invested wrong and get rid of them. Quality is in the eye of the holder, and believe me, I've looked at plenty of domain portfolios that the owner just knew were million dollar domains but in my opinion, they'd be hard pressed to get anyone to take them off their hands for just the registration costs. You have to figure that most of the best .com domains were registered in the 90's, and those are the ones you typically see the 6-7+ figure sale prices on. I'm not saying there isn't money to be made because there is. But it does take time, research and money, and maybe in some cases a little bit of luck. If you're thinking of getting into the industry, I recommend digging into the resources provided by Michael Cyger on http://domainsherpa.com and from there, moving to some of the other big blogs such as TheDomains.com or

Chris takes us through his stages of domain investing: educating himself, antique picking previously owned dropped domains, buying brandable expired domains and his first 2 profitable flips. We touch on the tough topics of frontrunning and GoDaddy expired auction changes, plus the 4 letter word of domainers, CALL- with Chris’ current 100% success rate on phone calls!


For the following TLDs you can now find a expired/deleted domain list. .cr, .gd, .gs, .im, .ke / .co.ke, .kg, .kz, .ir, .la, .ma, .pe / .com.pe, .pm, .re, .tf, .wf, .yt, .so, .th / .co.th, .uz They also show up in the Deleted Domains (last 7 days) list and in the Domain Name Search, however they are not in the pending delete list! I do not have a working droplist for them yet, so that is why they are not released in the pending delete list yet.
Here's a test I have in process.  I bought an old $5 closeout domain from Godaddy TDname expired auction.  I put a quick minisite up and linked to it with a crazy anchor text phrase.  The domain is ranking for that crazy term now.  It's gone through one pagerank update and I'm waiting for a second to come.  Then I'll redirect the domain to another minisite.  I suspect the second site won't rank for the anhor text, but we'll see.  
Also, Sedo.com, makes millions a week selling domains,even in the past week[3]! If you want to sell here, I would probably use a paid category or featured listings, one of my category listings, got 44 views in just 1 week but still waiting for a sale this month, hopefully. I would not really on this as a business, unless you add web development to it, and also, be sure to check that you are making a good profit, say within 6 months!
Control your expectations and keep them based on facts, data and expert opinions. Use a tool like EstiBot to get a general idea of how much the domain may be worth. Do understand that this is an automated appraisal tool, so take those numbers with a grain of salt. However, it’s great to get you started. You can also use paid, human-based appraisal services from Sedo and other providers, but these can get costly. If you’re not careful, you could easily overspend on such services and then realize your domain may not even be worth the appraisal fee.
Once you have a name in mind, how do you know if the price is fair? I like to use namebio.com to compare the domain I’m thinking about buying with similar domains that have sold. You can enter the keyword and also use some advanced search features to see a list of names similar to yours, what they actually sold for, and when they sold. You can also research current domain sales on venues like GoDaddy Auctions and Afternic. Finally, Ron Jackson issues a weekly report on DN Journal that covers the top public sales of the week. You can use all these resources to help you price your domains correctly.
Listen to expert domainers on domainsherpa.com. Read anything by Michael Berkens, Frank Schilling, Eliot Silver, Morgan Linton, and Ron Jackson. Watch YouTube videos on domain investing. Read blogs like The Industry News Magazine at DNJournal.com. Search #domains on Twitter. Go to industry conferences. Understand the Google Keyword Planner tool inside and out.
Since the Buyer pays Escrow.com and not the Seller, Escrow.com can withhold payment until we're satisfied the domain name has been transferred by the Seller. One of the ways Escrow.com does this is by checking the WHOIS database of the appropriate Registrar to make certain it properly reflects the new Buyer's name as the domain name Registrant. Once this has been verified, Escrow.com releases payment to the Seller.
I recommend Go Daddy premium and Afternic. Once you get it listed at those two places then do a redirect so that anyone who types the URL goes to one of those two, for-sale pages. I would suggest a price of $500 to $2,000. You might get lucky and attract a buyer in the next year or two. After two years, if it doesn’t sell I would just stop renewing it.

Finally, we’ll look at a bit of a different animal in the expired domains world and that’s pending delete. To do that just click on the pending delete button which is right next to the Go Daddy Auction’s button. What this does is it shows you domains that aren’t quite deleted yet. So, they’re right before they get into this deleted category in expired domains. They’re going to be deleted, so they haven’t been renewed by whoever registered them, so they’re going to get dropped.
Ur article is good but the problem is Flippas RESERVE PRICE and STart PRice are Ridiculous conflicting features.. which means sellers have no freedom to choose a good price.. But flippa gets its $10 even if seller makes $5. How shameless is this platform. Also, flippa is using a thirdparty brandable API for escrow, which allows them to charge ANY AMOUNT for escrow fee, and they are charing $25 in the name of third party. Serously flippa is a bunch of crooks
Let’s just say for example we wanted this site, crystalgiftsworld.com. It looked good based on our analysis and we’d head over to Snap Names, Nameja is another one and what these service do is they have special technology on their site that allows them to try  to register a domain on your behalf over and over again. Okay? If you tried to do that your IP would get banned, but they have some system where they know how to do it just enough to get the domain, but not enough to get blacklisted.
HIM: "Mainly small-medium sized local businesses looking for a way to increase their ranking. Most already have a branded domain in place, and have heard that using a keyword domain can help. Or they have seen a competitor ranking using that method. The problem I face is that they don't have a lot of money to spend, so I get lowballed on the asking price. There have been a few that make a ton of profit vs what I purchased it for, but that boils down to luck: what is for sale, when I find it, things like that."
To join, you’ll need to purchase an annual GoDaddy Auctions membership for $4.99 a year. Once you’ve purchased a membership, you can take advantage of member benefits such as our Auctions Tools, which can help you prepare before buying or selling any domains. After joining the auction community, you’ll quickly learn how to navigate the world of domain buying and selling and can begin to make money by investing in domain names.
Keyword relevancy is not the only thing that matters when it comes to SEO. However, domain names that were previously used by other businesses usually have a lot of backlinks and a decent ranking on PageRank. Even though such domain names are usually about to expire, they are still worth a lot of money if they have a good number of backlinks and a ranking of five or more.
Good point. Is the amount of work that went into getting a successful sale worth a $400 profit? Keep in mind, this is providing speculative numbers for the sake of debate. The real world hours invested in gaining position or page rank, and time a agency would sit on a domain before a sale would be much higher. We interviewed a few agencies that practiced this, not only those that supported our theory.

Wow I didn't expect A War & Peach novel, but, to have about 30 pages this is a very thin offering. My thought is if I get one idea from a $.99 e-book-it made it worthwhile. So there was mention in a keyword tool that might be helpful to me. But, generally speaking, As a s domain investor with sales under my belt, there is very little additional information that I can use here. If you are looking for a fast 10 minutes read this is it. I'd pass.
Buying a trademarked domain name could get you into a lot of hot water. Best case scenario is for the trademark holder to force you into handing the domain over and call it a day. Worst case scenario is you get into a legal battle and end up spending an arm and a leg. This is why it might be a good idea to use the United States Patent and Trademark Office’s (USPTO) website to check for trademarks if you’re unsure about a domain name.
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