Domains that are indexed on Google and highly ranked are particularly attractive to traders. Other SEO aspects, such as backlink profiles or the search volume of the keywords in domain names, also play a significant role in appraising value. Design can also positively affect the price of a domain. Short and succinct names that are easy to remember are especially advantageous. Endings are further factors that should be taken into account. Top-level domains (TLDs) such as .com or .org are by far the most sought-after endings.
Domain name expert Bill Sweetman has provided strategic domain name advice to major companies around the world for over 20 years. Bill is the President & Lead Ninja of Name Ninja, a boutique domain name consulting firm that helps companies acquire, manage, protect, and profit from their domain names. A self-confessed domain name fanatic, Bill registered his very first domain in 1994 (which he later sold for five figures) and has been perfecting his “Domain Karate” moves ever since.
Timothy Shim is a writer, editor, and tech geek. Starting his career in the field of Information Technology, he rapidly found his way into print and has since worked with International, regional and domestic media titles including ComputerWorld, PC.com, Business Today, and The Asian Banker. His expertise lies in the field of technology from both consumer as well as enterprise points of view.
I've fixed some speed related problems and the new search cluster is now live. The combination of both speeds up every search noticeably. Also some unfinished expired lists are no longer in the domain name search. Some users noticed that you could already find TLDs in the domain name search that were not released yet. This is not possible anymore, however if you are one of those users, contact me. Let me know what TLD you are interested in and I will prioritize it.
Premium Domains are domains that have already been registered by someone else but are now being resold for a premium rate. This means anyone can buy premium domains as they are being sold on the open market. At 123 Reg, we have a variety of fantastic premium domains for sale that you can now register. Buying a Premium Domain is the best way to secure popular domains that you would otherwise be unable to register. This means you can finally buy domains that you have had your eye on for a while but have previously not been able to as someone else has already registered them.
Lately I've noticed a lot of questions in Q&A centering on purchasing expired domains. A lot of our members have expressed interest in buying old domains for a variety of prices (some are cheap, some are going for upwards of $50k) and want some advice on what to do with the domains once they've been purchased. I'm no domainer, nor am I an expert in such a business tactic, but I generally recommend one of three different options for an expired domain (and would love to hear more if you've got any).
Your course of action really depends on how much work and effort you can put into the expired domain. If you're barely able to maintain and optimize your current site, you probably want to just 301 redirect the old site (note: see my amended comment above about the link value not likely to be passed). If, however, you're more creative and have some time on your hands, you can try your hand at crafting a microsite. If you really know your stuff and are experienced at making money off various websites, you'd probably do well with the third option.
Yes, buying existing domain names can be profitable too. Existing domains with a potential for profit can be found using Sedo. Make sure you pick domain names that have good traffic, backlinks and Google PageRank under 17 characters. Also, steer clear of existing domain names containing special characters or numbers because they are not likely to be sold.
Listing on domain marketplaces: This is the most common route. You should, however, acquaint yourself with each marketplace’s policies and fees before deciding to work with them. For example, Sedo’s commission starts at 10% and BrandBucket prohibits listing the domain anywhere else if you’re selling with them. Here’s a list of the most popular marketplaces (in no particular order):
I OWNED DOMPERIGNON.ORG, incredible, but true.  Lost it, back in the days when internet in India was not a readily accessible utility. And I was a casual domainer.  You had to go to a cybercafe. Did that late in the day, towards the expiry of the domain. No chance of renewal. The domain is now with the owners of Dom Perignon and is redirected to domperignon.com! 

Yes, buying existing domain names can be profitable too. Existing domains with a potential for profit can be found using Sedo. Make sure you pick domain names that have good traffic, backlinks and Google PageRank under 17 characters. Also, steer clear of existing domain names containing special characters or numbers because they are not likely to be sold.
Quite a lot of the time majestic trust flow will be great but ref domains below 10 but when I check ahrefs its considerably higher for ref domains. Without ahrefs I would of passed over these domains and missed out. Worthwhile addition if your building a lot of pbns. I also use linkultra backlink for my final spam check as it checks language,site type and if backlinks are comment, profile spammed etc enabling me to check if the backlinks of the domain are solid very quick.
Ur article is good but the problem is Flippas RESERVE PRICE and STart PRice are Ridiculous conflicting features.. which means sellers have no freedom to choose a good price.. But flippa gets its $10 even if seller makes $5. How shameless is this platform. Also, flippa is using a thirdparty brandable API for escrow, which allows them to charge ANY AMOUNT for escrow fee, and they are charing $25 in the name of third party. Serously flippa is a bunch of crooks
it can be profitable,i'm selling domains and i can tell you that all providers loose money selling domains,we compesate it with  hosting plans but if you look just domain selling where providers buying domain for 7$-10$ and selling it for 0.99$-5$ ...well like say we compesate this with web hosting plans and other services,also on when some one renew domain but since even renewal is done mostly using cupons...than giving free domain with web hosting is best solutions.Well like i say it can be profitable if you want work with domain,buying domains for 0.99$ and than work with it and you can earn nice money.
If you’re serious about domain flipping, one of the best strategies is to buy expiring domains that auctioned on the market such as GoDaddy Auctions. Make sure you pick domain names that have good traffic, backlinks and SEO metrics, or domains with the generic niche. Expiring domains with a potential for profit can be found using BuycomDomain.com, this is a free website/tool that helps you sort through the domains by different metrics (age, traffic, backlinks, domain authority etc).

Determine your domain's value. Before you start taking offers or listing your domain, take stock of its value so that you can come up with a good price. There are a lot factors to take into consideration when determining the value of a domain, so if you are unsure it may be wise to contact a company that performs these assessments. Some of the major factors include:


What I like to do is sort by DP which stands for domain pop, and this is basically the number of linking root domains. So, BL is the number of back links. As you know that can be somewhat misleading if they have a lot of site wide links or multiple links from the same domain. I like to sort by domain pop. What that does is it brings up the sites with the most amount of referring domains.
When speaking about an expired domain’s backlink profile, this refers to the incoming links that have built up from when the domain was previously in use. Recently-expired domains that have long histories aren’t unheard of. While the pre-existing content of the domain rarely remains visible when the domain is re-registered, links on the other hand do remain, as long as the new owner doesn’t devalue or delete them.
When you backorder the domain it will say how long you have to place your bid in. Let’s say it says 25 days. If the domain is from one of Namejet’s partners then the auction will start in 2-3 days. If this is an expiring domain and Namejet has to catch it there is a chance they won’t catch it in which case it won’t go to auction at Namejet. If they do catch it then 2-3 days before the auction starts.
I like to also click on the No Fake PR’s and No Unsure PR’s because a lot of fake page rank or page rank that’s been manipulated in the past and you want to make sure any authority that you see is real. Once you’ve picked all the criteria you want to choose, click on the apply filter button. This took our list from two million to 237. Now, even within that, that’s kind of overwhelming.
I don't necessarily agree with some that dropped domains don't have value for SEO purposes but either way one thing you can do is to check out our tool for finding auction domain names (the tool has a database of domains available buy from GoDaddy and SEDO and also give additional SEO criteria to look up for the domains like backlinks, Compete data, CPC, Google stats, Alexa stats, etc. and there is also an option to schedule auction domain alerts so that you can be notified via email if a domain name meeting criteria you specify gets put up for sale) or you could use our tool fo domains dropping soon that shows all domains dropping in the next 5 days that way you can be ready to snap them up right away.
Just because a domain has expired, doesn’t mean it has to be kicked to the curb immediately. It is worth considering turning the internet address into a parked domain for a certain period of time in order to generate advertising revenue. This allows domain owners to bide their time and come up with a new web project for the domain or to find a suitable buyer.
In today's SEO (2015) the answer would be a big no! With changes to the google algorithm and the constant updates panda, penguin, what's next...., much of the "keyword url" power is now gone. While there was a day when it made sense to buy a good named .com and expect instant indexing, not so anymore unless the site is very strong coming in ,which in that case you'll drop a minimum $50k. If you are willing to drop that kind of money and the site has a high domain authority, it might make sense as long as it matches whatever product or service that you're trying to sell. Just my opinion...
When you backorder the domain it will say how long you have to place your bid in. Let’s say it says 25 days. If the domain is from one of Namejet’s partners then the auction will start in 2-3 days. If this is an expiring domain and Namejet has to catch it there is a chance they won’t catch it in which case it won’t go to auction at Namejet. If they do catch it then 2-3 days before the auction starts.
Do you want to learn how to make money buying and flipping domain names? If so, this guide will provide you with the basic knowledge and direction required to get started! Unlike domain name investing, where a "buy and hold" strategy is the standard technique, domain name flipping is all about finding valuable domains and quickly selling them for a profit.
I am really new to all this. I am about to launch my blog in the next week. I have a domain and a wordpress blog set ready to go. Clearly it will have no traffic from day one and I guess it will take a while to build up. So my question is would you advise a begginer like me to stick with the one blog for a while and build it up. Or is it worth investing the time early on to master how to find expired domains and link them to the blog?
Listing on domain marketplaces: This is the most common route. You should, however, acquaint yourself with each marketplace’s policies and fees before deciding to work with them. For example, Sedo’s commission starts at 10% and BrandBucket prohibits listing the domain anywhere else if you’re selling with them. Here’s a list of the most popular marketplaces (in no particular order):
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