One big tip is to find a domain that someone can make money with. If you only owned that 1 domain, could you earn a living? This helps you focus on the top 1% of domains and ignore the junk that you will struggle to resell. You must get this right because domaining can bankrupt you fast if you buy the wrong domains. Godaddy is also great for grabbing expiring domains for much less.
Just like a property listing, except much simpler, domain marketplaces are basically massive lists of domain names that are up for sale. The process of using them is simple. Buy a domain and park it, then list your domain on the marketplace for a price you’re willing to let it go for. Once the domain is sold, the marketplace takes a cut and then passes on the remaining funds to you.
Lately I've noticed a lot of questions in Q&A centering on purchasing expired domains. A lot of our members have expressed interest in buying old domains for a variety of prices (some are cheap, some are going for upwards of $50k) and want some advice on what to do with the domains once they've been purchased. I'm no domainer, nor am I an expert in such a business tactic, but I generally recommend one of three different options for an expired domain (and would love to hear more if you've got any).
Yandex replaced TCI with SQI (Site Quality Index). SQI looks similar to TCI, so I re-used the old TCI field, however all values are now the new SQI. Not all domains are checked yet, but all that had TCI > 0, are now switched to SQI and all newly added domains are also checked for SQI (starting today). Updating all domains will take a couple months.

Use escrow services for direct sales. When you are dealing directly with the buyer, make sure that any money that is transferred goes through an escrow service. This will ensure that all checks clear and that you aren't left with a bounced check and no domain. Escrow services may add a few days to a sale and cost you a percentage, but they can save you a lot of heartache.


Here’s what you DON’T want to do: Target prospective buyers based on their perceived economic status, without any insight into the industry you’re targeting. “Lawyers seem to do well,” you think, “maybe I should start selling names to them.” So you rush out and buy a bunch of domain names you think would appeal to the law firms you’ve identified as potential buyers. Without knowledge of the space, you may not know that the American Bar Association and other industry-specific organizations set rules that govern some aspects of legal advertising. You’re not going to strike gold selling names your target buyers can’t use.
To sell a domain name, one should learn to price it. Many sellers fail to sell names in the marketplace, simply because they overpriced the domain, and thereby lost the chance to sell it. A lack of knowledge leads to erratic pricing. Experienced buyers will not try to bargain, unless you have a very rare name. A seller should therefore, understand how good the domain name is. What price will he get from a buyer? What suffix does it carry? For instance, .com names are likely to sell fast and will bring greater profits than, say .info names. Similarly, .net, .org and .in domain names are the best to make decent profit.
Hi I totally agree with you Domaineer42. My partner and I are web developers and are seeing a lot of ‘hype’ selling and not enough ‘real value’ selling based on actual search engine criteria. Recently brokers have knocked back selling domains with great potential value based on some pie-in-the-sky logic, defying even Estibot values we’re told to use. The domains were not our best but with four figure value, according to Estibot, I thought it was a great start as a newbie to domaining. In an industry which should flourish, some of these domain ‘fashionistas’ are making rods for their own backs by devaluing domains that have REAL potential value based on customer search. I don’t understand what is going on, but I have decided to opt out for awhile. We have quite a few domains in our repository, with data backed search criteria, trending upwards. Will bring them out of the closet when the industry is ready to get real.
While buying up a ton of domains seems like a great way to make some extra money, the real world results show that it is very hard to make that process profitable. As with any industry, you will have those "golden moments" when someone you read about made it into a million dollar a year business, all while sitting in the comfort of his own home. That could be true, but he probably consumed a lot of alcohol and lost a lot of hair doing it.

Domains that are indexed on Google and highly ranked are particularly attractive to traders. Other SEO aspects, such as backlink profiles or the search volume of the keywords in domain names, also play a significant role in calculating thevalue. Design can also positively affect the price of a domain. Short and succinct names that are easy to remember are especially advantageous. Endings are further factors that should be taken into account. Top-level domains (TLDs) such as .com or .org are by far the most sought-after endings.


I recommend Go Daddy premium and Afternic. Once you get it listed at those two places then do a redirect so that anyone who types the URL goes to one of those two, for-sale pages. I would suggest a price of $500 to $2,000. You might get lucky and attract a buyer in the next year or two. After two years, if it doesn’t sell I would just stop renewing it.
Once you’ve settled on some domain name ideas, you can head over to a bulk domain search tool such as DynaDot’s to mass check all the names against different TLDs. When you’ve found one (or a few) good candidates, you can simply go ahead and register them for approximately $10 each. The next step would then be to market them. Then finally, it’s a waiting game.

I've seen some people comment about losing the link value of domains that have expired and picked up, but what about non-expired domains?  Let's say a competitor is going out of business and they still have a year or two left, and we buy their domain and site.  Is there a risk changing registrant info and registrars, even if I keep their site up and mostly the same as before?  I was under the impression that I'd want to keep it under their name so as not to hit the uber-reset button on the domain's inbound link value.

Above you provided great information about buying and selling domain names. I have been to many blogs about the same and I have read the people make millions just by selling domain names. It's a process that one needs to learn with time and can give a good earning by reselling the domain name. The business is fruitful but one needs to read, understand the value of a domain name. Buying every domain name is a waste of money. One must see the future potential growth for that particular domain.
If you are looking to sell a domain name that is no longer of use to you, a possibility would be to lease it through a third-party company such as Godaddy, which lists tens of thousands of names. If the name is a quality one, there are also premium agents such as MediaOptions, which deals with more selective domain names. An alternative option would be to lease it out on platforms such as Nameforest.com. Doing so will save you the time of having to find potential buyers, and will guarantee a higher success rate than attempting to look for a purchaser on your own.

Keyword relevancy is not the only thing that matters when it comes to SEO. However, domain names that were previously used by other businesses usually have a lot of backlinks and a decent ranking on PageRank. Even though such domain names are usually about to expire, they are still worth a lot of money if they have a good number of backlinks and a ranking of five or more.
Hey, what’s up everybody. It’s Brian Dean from Quick Sprout. In this video, I’m going to show you how to buy affordable expired domains and how to evaluate the potential value that an expired domain could bring to your site. Now, expired domains is pretty gray hat, black hat type of thing because there’s basically two things you’re going to do in an expired domain.
When you are selling a domain name, you don’t want to suffer because of failed transactions or being tricked by defaulters. Safeguard your monetary dealings; the best way to do this is to take the help of a secure domain transfer and escrow service. The escrow system is highly beneficial because a buyer has to deposit money at the trusted source prior to purchase, and the dealing between a buyer and a seller takes place through a secure domain transfer and escrow service. This makes the transaction safer for both parties with the involvement of a neutral third party.
If you are looking to sell a domain name that is no longer of use to you, a possibility would be to lease it through a third-party company such as Godaddy, which lists tens of thousands of names. If the name is a quality one, there are also premium agents such as MediaOptions, which deals with more selective domain names. An alternative option would be to lease it out on platforms such as Nameforest.com. Doing so will save you the time of having to find potential buyers, and will guarantee a higher success rate than attempting to look for a purchaser on your own.
Use escrow services for direct sales. When you are dealing directly with the buyer, make sure that any money that is transferred goes through an escrow service. This will ensure that all checks clear and that you aren't left with a bounced check and no domain. Escrow services may add a few days to a sale and cost you a percentage, but they can save you a lot of heartache.
Most domains traders, or resellers, buy hundreds of domain names. This way, the chances of hitting the jackpot are higher. But, this takes some up front money. You can start with a handful of names and work your way up. This is the best way to begin. You may also decide to purchase a name from another seller if you think that a name will be big enough.
While buying up a ton of domains seems like a great way to make some extra money, the real world results show that it is very hard to make that process profitable. As with any industry, you will have those "golden moments" when someone you read about made it into a million dollar a year business, all while sitting in the comfort of his own home. That could be true, but he probably consumed a lot of alcohol and lost a lot of hair doing it.
Perspective buyers are able to directly contact domain holders in cases where the desired domain is no longer available. Most registries openly publish the names and contact data of domain holders. Once this information is gained, buyers can get in touch with domain holders and make an offer for the name. Sales are also known to occur in instances where the original domain owner had no prior commercial ambitions
Parking: While your domain is just sitting there waiting for its new owner, you might as well take advantage of it. Parking sets up automated advertising on your domain so that you earn money every time someone views/clicks on an ad. This could be especially useful if your domain is an expired one that’s already receiving traffic. Services that offer parking include Sedo, GoDaddy, 1and1 among many others.
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