Keyword relevancy is not the only thing that matters when it comes to SEO. However, domain names that were previously used by other businesses usually have a lot of backlinks and a decent ranking on PageRank. Even though such domain names are usually about to expire, they are still worth a lot of money if they have a good number of backlinks and a ranking of five or more.
I have an interesting twist on how I have done it in the past. I will buy a domain and use it as a development domain for blog posts and things of that nature. Then over time it will gain DA and PR. Then I will sell it off and buy another development domain and start the process over. Not quite the process you mentioned, but it works. People will link to the development site to show things off as well  sometimes, so that helps.
What I like to do is sort by DP which stands for domain pop, and this is basically the number of linking root domains. So, BL is the number of back links. As you know that can be somewhat misleading if they have a lot of site wide links or multiple links from the same domain. I like to sort by domain pop. What that does is it brings up the sites with the most amount of referring domains.
The backlink profile of a recently-available domain is a double-edged sword. While some expired domains have been well cared for by their previous owners and have high-quality links from reputable websites, some contain quite questionable backlinks. The worst case scenario is that the domain was merely used as a link farm to strengthen a major project in a satellite domain network and has already been penalized by some search engines.
Many people think of domain buying and selling to be one of the easiest methods of making quick money. Perhaps, you may have heard of someone buying a domain name for under $3000 and then selling it for $25,000. A quick $22,000 profit! Such stories can be very motivating! And that sort of money does exchange hands (Go through 10 of the biggest domain name sales of all time!). But these deals don’t come as easy as they seem! Ask anyone who flips domains for a living and he/she’ll tell you the amount of hard work and skill that goes into it.
There are several types of domain names to avoid. One is intentional misspellings, as these make it less likely someone will search for them. You also want to avoid names with extra symbols like hyphens, or with added prefixes and suffixes like "e" or "my." Outside of a few notable exceptions with very strong brands (like eBay), those additions can only hurt the value.[3]
This is similar to house flipping, where a home is purchased and fixed up in order to sell for a quick profit. Unlike house flipping, however, there is essentially nothing to be done with the domain name in order to increase its value. Therefore, the key to a successful domain flip is being in the right place at the right time in order to acquire a valuable domain name before it is given a premium price.
I have a question regarding a certain keyword though generic but it is trademarked and the trademark owner asked me to remove the parking page, is there a way i can offer my domain name to the company? What is the best approach in selling the domain to him without hard selling it and giving a reasonable price. I will be giving 10% commision to any domainer-mate that can help me pull the sale off.
As .COM is the natural domain extension for the United States based websites, it does get some priority in the Google.com’s search engine results (based on Google’s US datacenters) when competing against other countries’ domain extensions like .CO.UK, .CO.ZA, .COM.AU etc. However, .COMs don’t get automatic priority over other similar extensions like .ORG, .NET etc. that are also commonly used in the United States. All these domain extensions compete with .COMs on a level playing field.
Using the keyword search feature you’d also be able to familiarize yourself with how much domains typically cost on average in a certain industry or niche. Even better, they have an addictive little app called “The Domain Game” available for iOS and Android. They basically give you a domain and you try to guess whether it sold for three, four, five or six figures. You get points for each correct answer and lose points for incorrect ones. You do this for a while and you start to see patterns. Your brain starts connecting the dots and you get better it. Now you’re ready to go out there and scout some domains!
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