So, what I like to do is also choose DMAS listed entry. No fake or no unsure page rank. Click the apply filter button and this will show us a much better group of websites, including a lot of high page rank websites. That’s one great thing about Go Daddy Auctions that you don’t have to guess about what the rank will be which is not the case with a lot of deleted domains which, because they were deindexed they didn’t have any content, they didn’t have any hosting, they don’t have any page rank. So, you have to make an estimation.
With over 25 million .com domains registered with Google alone, this top-level domain is by far the most popular choice worldwide. According to the domain marketplace Sedo, in 2015 the average sales price for a .com domain name was over £3000. The most expensive publicly traded domain names have been known to fetch eight-figures sums. But don’t quit your day job just yet: such sales are the exception rather than the rule.
When speaking about an expired domain’s backlink profile, this refers to the incoming links that have built up from when the domain was previously in use. Recently-expired domains that have long histories aren’t unheard of. While the pre-existing content of the domain rarely remains visible when the domain is re-registered, links on the other hand do remain, as long as the new owner doesn’t devalue or delete them.
I recommend Go Daddy premium and Afternic. Once you get it listed at those two places then do a redirect so that anyone who types the URL goes to one of those two, for-sale pages. I would suggest a price of $500 to $2,000. You might get lucky and attract a buyer in the next year or two. After two years, if it doesn’t sell I would just stop renewing it.

Expired domains are domains that have been registered by individuals, businesses, or organizations, but aren’t renewed after the contract ends, or are deliberately terminated. That means that they available for re-registration. There are many reasons why someone would choose to abandon a domain; one reason could be that the web project failed, or that a domain portfolio went into liquidization. Domains can also end up becoming free due to the owner receiving warnings for possible trademark infringement. Re-registering can also result in legal consequences.
Get appraisals for your domain names. When selling, you will want to know what kind of price you should expect to get for your sites. There are a variety of websites that offer free appraisals for valuation. This includes larger domain auction sites such as Sedo.com, GoDaddy.com, and DomainIndex.com. These of course are only estimates, but they can give you a good idea of what certain domains might be worth.

Hi, I’m Mark! I’ve been an online entrepreneur, writer, website flipper and more for over 8 years now. Having faced the highs and lows of the online marketplace first-hand, I’ve learned quite a few things along the way. I’d love to share all those learnings with you here on this blog! Buying/selling websites can be great fun, provided you’re aware of the right tactics and know how to implement them correctly. My posts will help you do just that!
If you’re patient enough, you can discover at least four to five very good .COM domain names at attractive prices. However, you’ll need to carry out some research and find out the right places where they may be available. I’ve seen that such .COM deals can also be bagged from popular domain marketplaces like Flippa.com, or from the private portfolio portals of sellers, provided you employ the right strategies. You can contact the domain owners directly too. There’s no harm in emailing them directly to negotiate the prices.
Your domain name registrar may provide you with a free one-page Website tool, which you can use to create a “this domain is for sale” landing page. Alternatively, you can create a single page (perhaps a hidden page hanging off one of your existing websites) that indicates that your domain names are for sale. You can then forward all of your domain names that are for sale to that one page.

Control your expectations and keep them based on facts, data and expert opinions. Use a tool like EstiBot to get a general idea of how much the domain may be worth. Do understand that this is an automated appraisal tool, so take those numbers with a grain of salt. However, it’s great to get you started. You can also use paid, human-based appraisal services from Sedo and other providers, but these can get costly. If you’re not careful, you could easily overspend on such services and then realize your domain may not even be worth the appraisal fee.
The second option requires a bit more time and effort than a 301 redirect. You could do a mini overhaul of the site and turn it into a microsite for your main domain. This option is good for exact-match domains for your targeted keyword, and there are other reasons for going the microsite route that Rand's highlighted in his post about root domains, subdomains, subfolders and microsites. This strategy also works better if the old domain has decent rankings for the keywords you're targeting. 

Review Web Archive’s versions of the website: Examine the website’s history and how it looked like using the Web Archive. What was it about? What did it offer? This is useful for a variety of different reasons. It could inspire you as to who a good potential buyer might be (by analyzing the website’s content), and it could also signal some red flags in case the domain was being used for anything shady.
Timothy Shim is a writer, editor, and tech geek. Starting his career in the field of Information Technology, he rapidly found his way into print and has since worked with International, regional and domestic media titles including ComputerWorld, PC.com, Business Today, and The Asian Banker. His expertise lies in the field of technology from both consumer as well as enterprise points of view.
Internet users, who try to find expired domains and re-register them, will soon discover that this plan cannot be manually accomplished. Professional domain traders are familiar with the registry deletion process and rely on sophisticated algorithms that indicate when a domain is about to become available. Deletion lists are the result of this research. You can find many datasets online with domains that have already become available or will soon be. You often have to pay to be able to see this information.

You can still buy two word or three word domain names incorporating your target keywords. Moreover, there are millions of domain names out there which haven’t been used at all and are bound to expire soon. All such domains keep coming back to the domain marketplace. What more, there are useful tools available to research and filter through such expired domains.
Acquiring what you believe may be a valuable domain name is the easiest part of the equation.  Finding the right  buyer is much more difficult. Using auction sites and forums is perhaps the best way to find qualified buyers that are interested in your domain, and using auctions will take some of the stress away from establishing the value of a domain name yourself.

I've seen some people comment about losing the link value of domains that have expired and picked up, but what about non-expired domains?  Let's say a competitor is going out of business and they still have a year or two left, and we buy their domain and site.  Is there a risk changing registrant info and registrars, even if I keep their site up and mostly the same as before?  I was under the impression that I'd want to keep it under their name so as not to hit the uber-reset button on the domain's inbound link value.
Be careful! When searching for domains, it might be tempting to, for instance, buy mcdonalds.net (if it were available) and then try to sell it to McDonald's. The logic here would be that they own the .com and wouldn’t want anyone to own the .net and use their name, right? Also, it’s a big name so there’s gotta be a biiiiiiig payday comin’, RIGHT? Wrong, and wrong.
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