@ib2 @T-3D I've been a domain investor for over 10 years and have been very successful at it. There's a lot more that goes into it then just registering a domain name and hoping it will sell. You can list your domains on Godaddy auction listings or on premium listings, I've had a lot of success with those. Some good resources are namebio.com, dnjournal.com, namepros.com and others.
Yes, buying existing domain names can be profitable too. Existing domains with a potential for profit can be found using Sedo. Make sure you pick domain names that have good traffic, backlinks and Google PageRank under 17 characters. Also, steer clear of existing domain names containing special characters or numbers because they are not likely to be sold.
If you buy a domain from a 3rd party, the backlinks are valuable.  I always wait a few months before redirecting, so just set up a quick minisite until two page rank updates have passed and then go ahead and 301 redirect.  However, it seems that you'll get the link juice from the back links, the anchor text is ignored by Google.   Buying a domain at Godaddy TDName expired auctions, seem to not count as a dropped domain if you immediately set up a mini-site.
One of the best ways to obtain a valuable domain that is already search engine optimized is to purchase existing domains via auction sites.  This strategy can be beneficial mainly in two ways.  Firstly, any domain that has already been purchased was probably already researched for potential benefits.  Secondly and more importantly, the second benefit is that many recently expired domains still retain some of the search engine optimization attributes that were built up by the previous owner. For example, a recently expired domain name may still have active backlinks on the web, and the page rank of the domain could still be high, giving the purchaser instant SEO gratification with minimal effort.
A suspiciously high number of backlinks from some related niche websites that aren’t too great in quality. In my opinion, this could be an indicator that the domain name was using a Private Blog Network (PBN) service or their own PBN to boost their authority…this blackhat tactic can work, but it places your domain name at risk and the PBN owner could pull backlinks at any time.
Sometimes people purchase domains that they plan to build a website on or sell in the future, but it just doesn’t end up happening. If an individual decides that it is no longer worth the yearly investment of keeping the domain in their account, they may choose to let it expire. Or, someone might just forget to renew the domain before the expiration date. If this happens, it’s a great chance for other domain investors to score rare domain names that are pending delete. Spending time perusing the list of recently dropped domains can be a worthwhile way to find high quality domains.
Choose Niches that make money: People will buy a website domain if they think they can use it to make money. So buying popular phrases/words that could be associated with selling something like computers(.com) or hotels(.com) could be used by a company to sell computers or hotel reservations. However, something like Warof1812(.com) may not have the same business potential.
The practice of exploiting misspelled variants of popular websites for personal gain is known as typosquatting. Users who incorrectly enter URLs into a browser’s search bar may be getting more than what they’ve bargained for and end up on a squatted domain. We’ll show you how typosquatters exploit the simple workaday mistakes of internet users and how website operators and their visitors can...
When you backorder the domain it will say how long you have to place your bid in. Let’s say it says 25 days. If the domain is from one of Namejet’s partners then the auction will start in 2-3 days. If this is an expiring domain and Namejet has to catch it there is a chance they won’t catch it in which case it won’t go to auction at Namejet. If they do catch it then 2-3 days before the auction starts.
Many people think of domain buying and selling to be one of the easiest methods of making quick money. Perhaps, you may have heard of someone buying a domain name for under $3000 and then selling it for $25,000. A quick $22,000 profit! Such stories can be very motivating! And that sort of money does exchange hands (Go through 10 of the biggest domain name sales of all time!). But these deals don’t come as easy as they seem! Ask anyone who flips domains for a living and he/she’ll tell you the amount of hard work and skill that goes into it.
Yes, we port in all of the domains from NameJet, SnapNames, etc. There are a lot of great deals to be found. Some are absolute trash of course but if you can sift through them and put some time in (hopefully that is what we are trying to do with our tools is save time and give some value add with the SEO metrics, alerts, etc.) then you can find some great bargains.
There is NO accurate way to predict the sale of digital assets – if someone wants it, they’ll buy it. For example, those wasting their money on useless .com’s (LLLL’s that have no rhyme or reason) will spend 3x more time and money optimizing their useless name as someone that buys ANY keyword loaded domain (regardless if a TLD or new one). But these individuals who are spending thousands on domains will eventually get stuck with these domains in favor of (you guessed it) the oft forgotten yet highly useful 1-3 keyword domains. Why? Study Google’s algorithm as I have for over a decade, and you’ll figure it out.
So, you paste the domain into here and click on the search domains button. This will show you more information about the pending delete status domain. In this case, you have to order by June 13th and today is the 10th. So, you have three days and you just add it to your cart as if you’re just buying anything online. Just check it off and click add to cart. It’s added to your cart and they will try to get it on your behalf.
Let’s just say for example we wanted this site, crystalgiftsworld.com. It looked good based on our analysis and we’d head over to Snap Names, Nameja is another one and what these service do is they have special technology on their site that allows them to try  to register a domain on your behalf over and over again. Okay? If you tried to do that your IP would get banned, but they have some system where they know how to do it just enough to get the domain, but not enough to get blacklisted.
Thanks for the great review on domain flipping. I could definitely see myself getting into domain flipping down the road. I constantly find myself thinking of domains that are probably worth buying. But the way you have presented and analyzed which keywords get the most page views makes it more like long term investing. I also never considered trying to market the domain names or that Adsense money could be generated. Thanks for sharing and good luck with your domains!
The term flipping implies a sale that is done in a flip, or in a quick and sudden manner. You cannot be considered a domain flipper if all you do is just list your domain names and wait for years for them to sell. At its core, domain flipping is about spotting the right opportunities at the right time, involving strategic buying and selling of websites for profit.
Very good article and overview explanation. However I would not recommend buying names with bitcoin, ripple, etc in them. Not only will it be oversaturated those names are brands and can / will be trademarked and you can still be hit with a UDRP. Only register generic names like buycrypto.com, buyingcryptocurrency.com, theblockchain.com, etc. There are tons of opportunities and no need to infringe on a brand name.
Domain investors build a portfolio of valuable domain names, and attempt to sell them at a profit. Both Sedo and Afternic offer domain marketplaces (also known as Domain Listing Services, or DLS) for investors to advertise their domains to potential buyers. Once the seller and buyer agree, the aftermarket platforms then facilitate the purchase and transfer of the domain(s). As an Enom customer, you’re entitled to list your domains for sale on Sedo, Afternic, or both at the same time. Get started
I've seen some people comment about losing the link value of domains that have expired and picked up, but what about non-expired domains?  Let's say a competitor is going out of business and they still have a year or two left, and we buy their domain and site.  Is there a risk changing registrant info and registrars, even if I keep their site up and mostly the same as before?  I was under the impression that I'd want to keep it under their name so as not to hit the uber-reset button on the domain's inbound link value.
The first thing you need to do is signup at Namejet in order to get your account (signup is free).  You can then use their search functionality to sort through all the upcoming domains for auction.  Place bids for $69 on the ones you want to go to auction for.  If you bid on 100 different domains for $69 each, and there is 50 bidders for each auction you need to understand you aren’t going to owe any money, you are not committing $6,900 to Namejet.  By entering that $69 you are getting an entry into the live bidding when the 30 days expire.  Only if you are the ONLY bidder on a domain would you automatically win the domain and owe $69 to Namejet.

Be careful! When searching for domains, it might be tempting to, for instance, buy mcdonalds.net (if it were available) and then try to sell it to McDonald's. The logic here would be that they own the .com and wouldn’t want anyone to own the .net and use their name, right? Also, it’s a big name so there’s gotta be a biiiiiiig payday comin’, RIGHT? Wrong, and wrong.
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