If you buy keyword specific domains, you're really buying the type in traffic.  I use the URL builder and redirect through that URL so you can see how much traffic your getting from the keyword domain.  There seems to be no rythme or reason to what keyword domains deliver traffic and what don't.  By tracking traffic with the Google URL builder you get a feel for what names are giving you traffic and which are not. ie. the plural, the singular, two words, three words, the possessive, etc.
Most popular auctions with expiring domains are at godaddy, namejet, snapnames. Search for expired domains name its very easy if you have domains list. With a bit luck, you can drop good one with PR5 cheaper like $200, just need to know which domain have not fake pr. List of domains are not free, but updated dailly with aprox. 50.000 new expiring domain names.
Many non-savvy internet users may not even be aware of the existence of other extensions. That said, because there are many new extensions popping up every now and then, you can often find amazing one word and 3-letter domain names with these new extensions that are otherwise almost impossible to find unregistered in the .com world. Additionally, these new extensions are becoming more and more familiar to users every day, hence it's almost certain that their value will continue to increase as time passes and wider adoption manifests. 

What about option #4 - Redirect your existing domain to the old domain? I bought an old domain that is 100% relevant to my current domain but currently has with very little content. It did have more content fours years ago. The old domain is 13 years old, pr=3, while my current is 7 months old pr=1 and a decent amount of content. The old domain I purchased was not expired though and I do not know if this makes a difference. What are the pros and cons of option #4? Am I correct to think that option #1 would result in no benefit from the old domain's age value and if so why is it not listed as a con, a MAJOR one. Its hard to believe that a 301 using option 1 would give my existing domain 13 years credit but I'll take it if it does.
Your course of action really depends on how much work and effort you can put into the expired domain. If you're barely able to maintain and optimize your current site, you probably want to just 301 redirect the old site (note: see my amended comment above about the link value not likely to be passed). If, however, you're more creative and have some time on your hands, you can try your hand at crafting a microsite. If you really know your stuff and are experienced at making money off various websites, you'd probably do well with the third option.
Hi guys, just a thought, you do not need to build traffic to the domain yourself, you can always buy expired domains, best to subscribe to a paid service like dropping.com (so you are the first to know) or a free one, expireddomains.net and in this way, you can get old domains that have traffic. You could use these domains for parking, getting advertising income or even to sell. I have noticed, that domains that were not hot in the past, can still be hot now, just use Google Trends to type in the keyword, and you will see its future projections. 
What about option #4 - Redirect your existing domain to the old domain? I bought an old domain that is 100% relevant to my current domain but currently has with very little content. It did have more content fours years ago. The old domain is 13 years old, pr=3, while my current is 7 months old pr=1 and a decent amount of content. The old domain I purchased was not expired though and I do not know if this makes a difference. What are the pros and cons of option #4? Am I correct to think that option #1 would result in no benefit from the old domain's age value and if so why is it not listed as a con, a MAJOR one. Its hard to believe that a 301 using option 1 would give my existing domain 13 years credit but I'll take it if it does.

Prospective buyers can contact domain holders directly in cases where the desired domain is no longer available. Most registries openly publish the names and contact data of domain holders. Once this information is gained, buyers can get in touch with domain holders and make them an offer for the name. Sales are also known to occur even when the original domain owner may necessarily have never had any prior commercial ambitions
Listen to expert domainers on domainsherpa.com. Read anything by Michael Berkens, Frank Schilling, Eliot Silver, Morgan Linton, and Ron Jackson. Watch YouTube videos on domain investing. Read blogs like The Industry News Magazine at DNJournal.com. Search #domains on Twitter. Go to industry conferences. Understand the Google Keyword Planner tool inside and out.

Also, Sedo.com, makes millions a week selling domains,even in the past week[3]! If you want to sell here, I would probably use a paid category or featured listings, one of my category listings, got 44 views in just 1 week but still waiting for a sale this month, hopefully. I would not really on this as a business, unless you add web development to it, and also, be sure to check that you are making a good profit, say within 6 months!
I have some pot related ones I've purchased recently that deal with the manufacturing of hemp like hempmfr.com, hempmoulding.com, hemp-textiles.com, hempecofuel.com etc.  Some of the older domains I've been sitting on are ones like internetpot.com, califunk.com, cafunk.com, caedibles.com, 1tokewonder.com, govherb.com, grasspeddlers.com, pot-megastore.com, usgov420.com etc.  Another interesting recent on I've purchased is Dogparkdates.com and dogpark-dating.com. Do any of these seem valuable in your eyes?
Domain names have been on sale ever since the Internet revolution began during the 90s. Just because some entrepreneurs had the foresight to buy profitable domains before the rest of the world caught up with the trend, doesn’t make them domain hoarders. Domain names are just like the real estate sold in the off-line world. Anyone is free to buy/sell as many properties as one likes if his/her means permit.
Also, Sedo.com, makes millions a week selling domains,even in the past week[3]! If you want to sell here, I would probably use a paid category or featured listings, one of my category listings, got 44 views in just 1 week but still waiting for a sale this month, hopefully. I would not really on this as a business, unless you add web development to it, and also, be sure to check that you are making a good profit, say within 6 months!
In theory, you could technically acquire a domain for $10,000 and be able to sell it for $100,000. You could also acquire a domain for $10 and be able to sell it for $100,000, $10,000… or $100, you get the picture. Because of this, it’s hard to recommend a perfect starting budget because your strategy, experience, and the pace at which you learn will hugely affect your buying and selling decisions.
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