A good majority of web developers view the domain flipping industry with disdain as they face a hard time finding the right domain names for their own development projects. Domain flipping is also looked down upon by corporate and business entities who register multiple domains related to their trademarks or business names. Actually, it is these people who’re the real domain name squatters!
A good majority of web developers view the domain flipping industry with disdain as they face a hard time finding the right domain names for their own development projects. Domain flipping is also looked down upon by corporate and business entities who register multiple domains related to their trademarks or business names. Actually, it is these people who’re the real domain name squatters!
Hi I totally agree with you Domaineer42. My partner and I are web developers and are seeing a lot of ‘hype’ selling and not enough ‘real value’ selling based on actual search engine criteria. Recently brokers have knocked back selling domains with great potential value based on some pie-in-the-sky logic, defying even Estibot values we’re told to use. The domains were not our best but with four figure value, according to Estibot, I thought it was a great start as a newbie to domaining. In an industry which should flourish, some of these domain ‘fashionistas’ are making rods for their own backs by devaluing domains that have REAL potential value based on customer search. I don’t understand what is going on, but I have decided to opt out for awhile. We have quite a few domains in our repository, with data backed search criteria, trending upwards. Will bring them out of the closet when the industry is ready to get real.
Think about things like contractor.com or oranges.com. The more generic you go, the better off you will be. Why? Research has shown that Google likes generic names, so any company selling oranges may, for example, want the oranges.com domain name. If you own that name, you can set the asking price for it. Sounds great, right? There arejust a few things you have to think about first.
Listen to expert domainers on domainsherpa.com. Read anything by Michael Berkens, Frank Schilling, Eliot Silver, Morgan Linton, and Ron Jackson. Watch YouTube videos on domain investing. Read blogs like The Industry News Magazine at DNJournal.com. Search #domains on Twitter. Go to industry conferences. Understand the Google Keyword Planner tool inside and out.

To find popular phrases I opened up the Google Keyword Planner. This free tool by Google, allows you to find out how often a word or phrase is searched in Google. A phrase like “Yoga Mat’ has on average, about 10K – 100k monthly searches. That’s A LOT. However a more niche phrase like “Good Yoga Mats” only has 100 – 1K monthly searches. These seem similar, but I wanted to focus on the exact popular phrase that people are searching for.
When I first started online, I'd register domains that I thought I could develop and sell at a later time. After learning my way around the cloud, I realized many of the domains I'd registered are pretty much useless, or so I thought, and I let them expire. Come to find out several of these domains have been picked up by parking sites and are being offered for sale for thousands of dollars! Now I'm not saying they're actually selling for the asking price, but I learned my lesson. I never allow a domain name to expire. I add content to it, backlinks, some AdSense and try to sell it for something.
Selecting a profitable niche is very important when it comes to domain flipping. Having adequate knowledge in searching domain names is critical. It will help you with fishing as well as parking domain names. Carving out a niche for yourself will enable you to seek out prospective buyers actively who would be interested in the domain names you are offering.
Then the number is an HRL so it’ll be quite a bit different then you’ll see an expired domains because domain pop service is not very good compared to HREFs. Usually this shows about 20 percent of the total lengths. This shows more like 80. Okay? As you can see it has actually 162 referring domains which is quite a lot better than we saw in expired domains.
The great thing about this is that it’s kind of like a metasearch engine for all the places that you can find expired domains around the web. First, let’s look at deleted domains. Okay? To do that, you go click on the deleted domains button here and then click on any top level domain that you want to get. I prefer .com because it’s obviously the most common top level domain.
Instead of focusing on one domain name to sell quickly, try selling large volumes of domain names over longer periods of time. While this may require a more substantial investment, it will also return a greater profit in the long term. Remember, if you follow the basic principles of domain name speculation, there is good chance that your domain names will sell eventually.
The great thing about this is that it’s kind of like a metasearch engine for all the places that you can find expired domains around the web. First, let’s look at deleted domains. Okay? To do that, you go click on the deleted domains button here and then click on any top level domain that you want to get. I prefer .com because it’s obviously the most common top level domain.
While numbers like those above are impressive, most domains sell for significantly less extravagant prices and are generally in the two or three-digit range. Not long ago, those who were able to secure general terms (like icecream.com or pizza.com) not protected by trademark rights often found themselves sitting on virtual gold mines. The glory days of this boom have long since passed, and those looking for a profit in today’s market needto have a keen sense for coming trends.
When the domain drops, the minute it drops, literally, they will try to get it and if you can get it, it’s yours. So, that’s it for expired domains. You can see it’s a little bit complicated and it takes some leg work, but if you’re interested in building a publisher network or a private blog network, this is a great way to find sites that have a great link profile without you having to actually build any links. So, that’s it for this video. I’ll see you in the next one.
GoDaddy’s domain auction space serves as a “marketplace” for buyers and sellers to get together and make deals. When a domain expires, it typically goes right back to the registry. If it’s a valuable domain name, however, registrars will try to sell it through auction, and buyers are always eager to capitalize on potential deals. Participating in a domain auction can be a nuanced business, so take a look at our Auctions FAQ page for more details on the process.

No, no, no. ToysRUs made a perfectly logical decison that most any business would do and Google tanked them for it. ToysRUs wanted the url toys.com to direct to their site.  They're all about toys and they simply bought a url that described their business and told the url where to take people.  Google tanked them in the rankings because Toys.com came with link juice. Google assumed that Toys.com was doing this to manipulate the search engines but there is just, to my knowledge, ZERO evidence of this.  This is another case of Google caring more about the possible spam threat than the actual rankings for searchers.
But in general, the best and easy way to sell a domain is to go with a marketplace. There is many popular marketplace dedicated to selling domains including Flippa and SellDom to sell your domain (full disclosure, I’m working on SellDom). The advantage is to leverage the popularity of that kinds of services in hope that someone will find your domain and buy/make an offer.
You can turn then into content sites, set up an actual website, or try to sell that site elsewhere. You may even luck out by selling a site that's up and running and full of great content already. In this case, you can ask a higher price. Or, you can set up a shared hosting or direct hosting website. Shared hosting and direct hosting websites can be profitable too.
Hi Kulwant, these are great tips as usual. I particularly like the way to tell us to check the google pagerank in case the domain has been banned – that could lower the usefulness of the domain quite a bit. One thing though, don’t you think that buying domains is sometimes immoral? Like sometimes you accidentally buy a domain of somebody elses website who forgot to renew.
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If you are looking to monetize an idle domain, looking to third-party platforms would be a good idea. Many of these platforms such as Nameforest ourselves will create a logo alongside your domain, which will be added to the list of preexisting domains on their sites. This is useful as the demand for your domain will also be greatly increased after it is rented as opposed to a domain that leads to a blank site - thus making it easier for you to find a potential buyer.
Content setup: If your domain has potential to attract good search engine traffic, you might want to set up some content to help facilitate that. If this helps your domain do better in the search engine rankings then it’s a big win regardless of whether you choose to flip the domain only or flip the domain with the content as a “website”. The SEO value will be helpful either way.
Keyword relevancy is not the only thing that matters when it comes to SEO. However, domain names that were previously used by other businesses usually have a lot of backlinks and a decent ranking on PageRank. Even though such domain names are usually about to expire, they are still worth a lot of money if they have a good number of backlinks and a ranking of five or more.
Here's a test I have in process.  I bought an old $5 closeout domain from Godaddy TDname expired auction.  I put a quick minisite up and linked to it with a crazy anchor text phrase.  The domain is ranking for that crazy term now.  It's gone through one pagerank update and I'm waiting for a second to come.  Then I'll redirect the domain to another minisite.  I suspect the second site won't rank for the anhor text, but we'll see.  
No, no, no. ToysRUs made a perfectly logical decison that most any business would do and Google tanked them for it. ToysRUs wanted the url toys.com to direct to their site.  They're all about toys and they simply bought a url that described their business and told the url where to take people.  Google tanked them in the rankings because Toys.com came with link juice. Google assumed that Toys.com was doing this to manipulate the search engines but there is just, to my knowledge, ZERO evidence of this.  This is another case of Google caring more about the possible spam threat than the actual rankings for searchers.
What if we replace “bitcoin” with “ripple” in all these examples? SellRipple.com? RippleGiftCards.com? Ripple.network? Ripple.us…etc. You get the picture. There are a 100 of these on NameBio + the keywords we got from the Google Keyword Planner, that’s hundreds of potential high-value domains right there. The thing is, we’re only scratching the surface here. According to Wikipedia, there are over 1,300 cryptocurrencies online as of January 2018.
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