Domain names expire when someone decides to stop renewing it. They may not be available to register immediately. We update the search index every night, so some names may already be renewed or re-registered. Some may become available in a few days. Some registrars, like GoDaddy, will let you buy a name that one of their own customers expire immediately. When you find a name you like, just click on it to try backordering the name!
The second option requires a bit more time and effort than a 301 redirect. You could do a mini overhaul of the site and turn it into a microsite for your main domain. This option is good for exact-match domains for your targeted keyword, and there are other reasons for going the microsite route that Rand's highlighted in his post about root domains, subdomains, subfolders and microsites. This strategy also works better if the old domain has decent rankings for the keywords you're targeting. 

I have a question regarding a certain keyword though generic but it is trademarked and the trademark owner asked me to remove the parking page, is there a way i can offer my domain name to the company? What is the best approach in selling the domain to him without hard selling it and giving a reasonable price. I will be giving 10% commision to any domainer-mate that can help me pull the sale off.
There are many places and ways you can purchase domain names.  You can purchase unregistered ones through sites like GoDaddy.  There are forums where people will gladly try to sell you their domain name (usually though the domains being sold in forums are either crap or the asking price is so high it does not allow you any room to flip the domain).  And then there is my favorite way of obtaining domain names, through an online auction at Namejet.  Let’s first talk about Namejet and then we’ll talk about how I personally ring the register by flipping domains.
Get appraisals for your domain names. When selling, you will want to know what kind of price you should expect to get for your sites. There are a variety of websites that offer free appraisals for valuation. This includes larger domain auction sites such as Sedo.com, GoDaddy.com, and DomainIndex.com. These of course are only estimates, but they can give you a good idea of what certain domains might be worth.
Namejet is a domain clearing house (at least that is my term for it).  What happens is that people let their domain names expire everyday.  Some people just don’t need their domain anymore, some people forget to renew it, some people die, I mean there can be hundreds of reasons why a domain will not be renewed.  What the domain registrars want to do is cash in on the domain that someone forgot to renew, so they offer that domain to Namejet to auction it to the general public.  Think of it like a storage unit, someone doesn’t make their payment and the storage company hires an auctioneer to come and auction the storage unit to the general public.  Namejet is doing this but for domain names.  The bid for each domain starts at $69.  What I LOVE about Namejet is the process…  they let you search through the domains that are coming up for auction 30 days in advance.  Whoever places a $69 bid on a domain will be entered into an auction when the 30 days runs out with everyone else who placed a bid.  If you are the only bidder than you get the domain for $69.  If there are 10 other bidders than there is a closed auction, meaning only you 10 guys can bid now against each other in a 3 day auction with the highest bidder taking the domain when the clock strikes zero.  I love this because let’s say there is a great domain and it flies under the radar.  If it goes to auction with only 3 or 5 or 7 bidders my chances of winning this domain at a very low price are great.  I’ve won domains for $100 which I was able to flip for $2,000.  I won a domain for $2,500 which I flipped within 4 months  for $7,500.  I won a domain for $1,000 which I’ve turned down $5,000 offers on because I think I can get $10,000 for it.  The key is to not overpay in order to leave yourself plenty of room to turn a profit when you flip the domain.

The most popular place by far is ExpiredDomains.net. The main advantage of ExpiredDomains.net is that it aggregates data from a lot of different auctions and websites around the web. There are also paid services like DomCop. DomCom helps you identify worthy domains faster by displaying some additional data points that allow you to vet domains easily and in a unified interface. And finally, there are services that curate domains they believe are worthy such as JustDropped.com’s newsletter.

What you really want to do first is scroll down to where it says, referring pages for anchor phrases. All that is is the anchor text distribution to that site. As you can see here this looks like a very natural link profile. Brand name, a product that they had, no text, URL, shopping cart, wireless government. These are the keywords that were related to what that site was about. Okay?
You can find the new fields in the Column Manager and the Majestic Filter Tab. Majestic Crawled URLs, Information about the Outbound Links of the Domain and Information about the types of Incoming Links (follow, homepage, ...). Also you can now see the detected language for the website (or previous website) on the domain and the language of the anchor text links referring to the domain. The filter for the website language only includes values with at least 20% and the filter for anchor texts only with at least 10%. When you hover over the column, you still see all values (even lower percentages), but lower values are not used for the filter. If you only want to see domains matching the majority language, use the "majority language" filter. Unfortunately that filter doesn't work in the domain name search
Domain names expire when someone decides to stop renewing it. They may not be available to register immediately. We update the search index every night, so some names may already be renewed or re-registered. Some may become available in a few days. Some registrars, like GoDaddy, will let you buy a name that one of their own customers expire immediately. When you find a name you like, just click on it to try backordering the name!

This is similar to house flipping, where a home is purchased and fixed up in order to sell for a fast profit. Unlike house flipping, however, there is essentially nothing to be done with the domain name in order to increase its value. Therefore, the key to a successful domain flip is being in the right place at the right time in order to acquire a valuable domain name before it is given a higher price.


Those trading domains for commercial purposes are generally on the prowl for lucrative domain endings. There are essentially two different ways traders go about making money off of domain names. One method entails purchasing already established names for a low price and selling them for a profit later once their value has increased. Another strategy involves buying and registering a domain that is thought to possess a high sales potential. Many domain traders use backorder services. These services automatically register a domain when one becomes available or is deleted (what are known as expired domains).
Referring domains for anchor phrases usually reveals similar information. What you really want to look out for is whether or not the site has been picked up by a spammer in the past. A lot of times these expired domains were dropped, picked up by a website owner who then tried to rank it for keywords like Viagra, Cialis and whatever. You obviously don’t want that kind of domain.
Once you get to this point you know there have been DMAS listed. They have a number of domains linking to them and according to the way back machine which is WBY, you can see their site age. So, if you want to go with an older site you can see right here whether or not this is a site that you might be interested in, but before pulling the trigger you do want to check two things.
A good majority of web developers view the domain flipping industry with disdain as they face a hard time finding the right domain names for their own development projects. Domain flipping is also looked down upon by corporate and business entities who register multiple domains related to their trademarks or business names. Actually, it is these people who’re the real domain name squatters!
Karn Jajoo heads the premium names program for Radix’s domain extensions: .WEBSITE, .PRESS, .HOST, .SPACE, .SITE, .TECH, .ONLINE, .STORE & .FUN. Radix has made more than $1.75 million in premium domains revenue in 2017 thus far, including the biggest nTLD sale of all times — casino.online, and the sale of business.site to Google for it’s free website builder, Google My Business. Karn considers himself a new gTLD evangelist and has had articles published in The Next Web, Website Magazine, & CMO.com.

Selling on auction sites is another great way to find buyers. Ebay.com is perhaps, the most popular place to sell domain names. Afternic.com is another site that allows sellers to find good buyers. If you have premium domain names, become a member at GreatDomains.com and list your domain name there. The site is a reputed marketplace and brokers deal with thousands of dollars trading domain names. You can also sell domain names through Sedo.com, a site which has its own selling program. Sedo.com has the largest marketplace in the world, and boasts of having a list of the most expensive domain names in the market. It also has a safe and secure escrow service for domain name buyers and sellers.


Namejet is a domain clearing house (at least that is my term for it).  What happens is that people let their domain names expire everyday.  Some people just don’t need their domain anymore, some people forget to renew it, some people die, I mean there can be hundreds of reasons why a domain will not be renewed.  What the domain registrars want to do is cash in on the domain that someone forgot to renew, so they offer that domain to Namejet to auction it to the general public.  Think of it like a storage unit, someone doesn’t make their payment and the storage company hires an auctioneer to come and auction the storage unit to the general public.  Namejet is doing this but for domain names.  The bid for each domain starts at $69.  What I LOVE about Namejet is the process…  they let you search through the domains that are coming up for auction 30 days in advance.  Whoever places a $69 bid on a domain will be entered into an auction when the 30 days runs out with everyone else who placed a bid.  If you are the only bidder than you get the domain for $69.  If there are 10 other bidders than there is a closed auction, meaning only you 10 guys can bid now against each other in a 3 day auction with the highest bidder taking the domain when the clock strikes zero.  I love this because let’s say there is a great domain and it flies under the radar.  If it goes to auction with only 3 or 5 or 7 bidders my chances of winning this domain at a very low price are great.  I’ve won domains for $100 which I was able to flip for $2,000.  I won a domain for $2,500 which I flipped within 4 months  for $7,500.  I won a domain for $1,000 which I’ve turned down $5,000 offers on because I think I can get $10,000 for it.  The key is to not overpay in order to leave yourself plenty of room to turn a profit when you flip the domain.
Use the advanced search option to quickly hone in on the type of names you are interested in. You can narrow the results by price, top-level domain (i.e, .com, .net, .org, .club, etc.), keyword, and many more filters. Using this feature will help you quickly sort through the millions of domains on the aftermarket and find the domain names that best fit your end goals.
While buying up a ton of domains seems like a great way to make some extra money, the real world results show that it is very hard to make that process profitable. As with any industry, you will have those "golden moments" when someone you read about made it into a million dollar a year business, all while sitting in the comfort of his own home. That could be true, but he probably consumed a lot of alcohol and lost a lot of hair doing it.
Now it’s time to transfer the domain name. Every site has its own process. Generally, the domain-selling sites require sellers to submit the authorisation code, which will initiate the transfer process. Once the transfer is completed, the seller can transfer funds from the escrow account to his personal account. Do check for the minimum number of days the amount must stay in the escrow account before the transaction can be completed.

The third option is the one that's the most time consuming but also has its benefits. It's like having a successful restaurant and buying another restaurant and operating them simultaneously. They're not the exact same restaurant, but both are popular in their own right and make you money. The same goes for Option #3. You could update the content on the old domain and sell the same products that you're selling on your current site. If you can get both sites to rank alongside each other in the SERPs, you're increasing your conversion chances and sales potential.


Those trading domains for commercial purposes are generally on the prowl for lucrative domain endings. There are essentially two different ways traders go about making money off of domain names. One method entails purchasing already established names for a low price and selling them for a profit later once their value has increased. Another strategy involves buying and registering a domain that is thought to possess a high sales potential. Many domain traders use backorder services. These services automatically register a domain when one becomes available or is deleted (what are known as expired domains).
No, no, no. ToysRUs made a perfectly logical decison that most any business would do and Google tanked them for it. ToysRUs wanted the url toys.com to direct to their site.  They're all about toys and they simply bought a url that described their business and told the url where to take people.  Google tanked them in the rankings because Toys.com came with link juice. Google assumed that Toys.com was doing this to manipulate the search engines but there is just, to my knowledge, ZERO evidence of this.  This is another case of Google caring more about the possible spam threat than the actual rankings for searchers.

If you are looking to monetize an idle domain, looking to third-party platforms would be a good idea. Many of these platforms such as Nameforest ourselves will create a logo alongside your domain, which will be added to the list of preexisting domains on their sites. This is useful as the demand for your domain will also be greatly increased after it is rented as opposed to a domain that leads to a blank site - thus making it easier for you to find a potential buyer.

There is a misconception that good ‘.COM’ domain names are hard to find and so they are more expensive to buy. But once again, this statement holds no water. You can easily check out the ‘.COM’ domain names that are on sale at highly affordable prices. However, the only downside to flipping ‘.COM’ domain names is that you will have to discover them at different places like Flippa.com or private seller portfolios.


Domains that are indexed on Google and highly ranked are particularly attractive to traders. Other SEO aspects, such as backlink profiles or the search volume of the keywords in domain names, also play a significant role in appraising value. Design can also positively affect the price of a domain. Short and succinct names that are easy to remember are especially advantageous. Endings are further factors that should be taken into account. Top-level domains (TLDs) such as .com or .org are by far the most sought-after endings.
Get appraisals for your domain names. When selling, you will want to know what kind of price you should expect to get for your sites. There are a variety of websites that offer free appraisals for valuation. This includes larger domain auction sites such as Sedo.com, GoDaddy.com, and DomainIndex.com. These of course are only estimates, but they can give you a good idea of what certain domains might be worth.
Control your expectations and keep them based on facts, data and expert opinions. Use a tool like EstiBot to get a general idea of how much the domain may be worth. Do understand that this is an automated appraisal tool, so take those numbers with a grain of salt. However, it’s great to get you started. You can also use paid, human-based appraisal services from Sedo and other providers, but these can get costly. If you’re not careful, you could easily overspend on such services and then realize your domain may not even be worth the appraisal fee.
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