Joe Styler serves as product manager for the aftermarket at GoDaddy. He’s responsible for marketplace products including any purchase, sale, or monetization of a domain name. During his nine-year tenure at GoDaddy Joe has served in a variety of directorial and supervisory roles. His passion is seeing his customers become successful in their business goals when using the aftermarket. He has been interested helping people with transactions on the Internet for more than 20 years. Joe received his B.A. from Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, and his Masters in Divinity from Gordon Conwell in Massachusetts.
Let’s just say for example we wanted this site, crystalgiftsworld.com. It looked good based on our analysis and we’d head over to Snap Names, Nameja is another one and what these service do is they have special technology on their site that allows them to try  to register a domain on your behalf over and over again. Okay? If you tried to do that your IP would get banned, but they have some system where they know how to do it just enough to get the domain, but not enough to get blacklisted.
There comes a time in the life of every domain when its ownership must transfer hands. The reasons for selling a domain can vary greatly; maybe the company is no longer being in business, or the domain was bought in bulk and never used. If you're looking to offload your extra domains to make some spare cash, or if you're sitting on a premium domain name worth a goldmine, see Step 1 below to learn how to sell it.
Each of the third parties we integrate with charge for getting metrics for a domain. DomCop pays for their API to get this data for you and therefore you do not need to purchase additional accounts to get these metrics. One DomCop account will do it all. As new players enter the market, we integrate with them so that you always have the best and most comprehensive set of metrics to help you decide which domain to buy.
Review Web Archive’s versions of the website: Examine the website’s history and how it looked like using the Web Archive. What was it about? What did it offer? This is useful for a variety of different reasons. It could inspire you as to who a good potential buyer might be (by analyzing the website’s content), and it could also signal some red flags in case the domain was being used for anything shady.
In the past, expired domains were used as part of black hat SEO in order to generate backlink sources quickly and easily, and this practice is still used somewhat today. Getting links in this way is not a recommendable practice. All relevant search engines work nowadays with highly complex ranking algorithms, which can no longer be outsmarted by these link networks.
So what are some strategies to finding great domains to flip?  Well, the first is to find quality domains.  There are some sights that publish a daily list of good upcoming Namejet auctions like here: http://www.tld.org .  This is an easy way without having to search to find some great upcoming auctions to bid on.  If you have the time you can search Namejet yourself.  The key is to making money by flipping domains is to find domains that other people will want.  If the 30 day window period just started on a domain (for this example let’s say it was Anticareer.com) you could use Google to search for ‘anticareer’ and ‘anti career’ and see if you can find people who own sites that may be interested in this domain.  Email them and ask them if they’d have an interest in purchasing the domain Anticareer.com.  If you get some bites you can then go and bid on the domain and if you win it you can flip it right away.  Once you get some experience it will be easy for you to spot the domain names which you can quickly and easily flip and you’ll also develop a good feel for what price you should pay to make yourself the amount of profit you want to make.
I've seen some people comment about losing the link value of domains that have expired and picked up, but what about non-expired domains?  Let's say a competitor is going out of business and they still have a year or two left, and we buy their domain and site.  Is there a risk changing registrant info and registrars, even if I keep their site up and mostly the same as before?  I was under the impression that I'd want to keep it under their name so as not to hit the uber-reset button on the domain's inbound link value.

What is a domain? Despite this word being mentioned so frequently, it’s often unclear what the functions and structures of domains are. Knowing the hierarchical structure of the Domain Name System (DNS) is fundamental for anyone working in IT or in any online industry. We explain the difference between top-level, second-level, and third-level domains, and how you can benefit from subdomains that...
Most popular auctions with expiring domains are at godaddy, namejet, snapnames. Search for expired domains name its very easy if you have domains list. With a bit luck, you can drop good one with PR5 cheaper like $200, just need to know which domain have not fake pr. List of domains are not free, but updated dailly with aprox. 50.000 new expiring domain names.
Now, a lot of times these great domains that have pending delete will get snapped up in a flash. Okay? You want to use the same system that’s 500,000 domains so you can always sort them by whatever you want to do to make sure you’re only looking at quality domains and look at the link profile the same way. Once you find one that you like, you can’t just sit on your computer at Go Daddy and wait for it drop on 6/14 and expect to get it because there’s going to be a lot of other people gunning for that domain. You actually have to use a service like Snap Name.
For the following TLDs you can now find a expired/deleted domain list. .cr, .gd, .gs, .im, .ke / .co.ke, .kg, .kz, .ir, .la, .ma, .pe / .com.pe, .pm, .re, .tf, .wf, .yt, .so, .th / .co.th, .uz They also show up in the Deleted Domains (last 7 days) list and in the Domain Name Search, however they are not in the pending delete list! I do not have a working droplist for them yet, so that is why they are not released in the pending delete list yet.
Flipping domains are similar to flipping houses in real estate: You buy a property with potential, improve it, and then sell quickly for twice the profit (or more). Between 2005 and 2012, internet marketers had been obsessed with flipping domains… and for good reason. Many were successful at buying plain old domain names, spicing them up with keyword-stuffed content, giving them much-needed traffic, and then selling them off to the highest bidder. But in 2017, can this still be a viable online business?
However, I'd argue that most people in the business really struggle as they don't understand what makes a good domain name and what's a bad domain name. While I do not work in this field full-time, I can say that I can make a living of it, but it's probably because I don't ask for absurd prices (e.g. randomword247.com domain name for $8000 is just unrealistic and won't happen) and therefore can sell domains easier. 
Many individuals have the habit of collecting attractive domain names but never using them. If so, why not get rid of unused domain names and in the process, make some cash? It is important to understand the whole process of selling domain names. On the outside, the process may look very easy, but unless a trader is well aware of how the whole process works, it is not easy to find a buyer.
Something wise my father once told me "Something is only worth how much someone is willing to pay for it." This small seemingly unimportant statement has guided me in many selling and purchasing decisions in my life. Sometimes, it makes the reality all too apparent. So, is buying a domain with the intention of selling it a good idea? Let's break down the details, and talk to some people that actively pursue this method. Yeah, we know a guy.

Many non-savvy internet users may not even be aware of the existence of other extensions. That said, because there are many new extensions popping up every now and then, you can often find amazing one word and 3-letter domain names with these new extensions that are otherwise almost impossible to find unregistered in the .com world. Additionally, these new extensions are becoming more and more familiar to users every day, hence it's almost certain that their value will continue to increase as time passes and wider adoption manifests. 
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