Listing on domain marketplaces: This is the most common route. You should, however, acquaint yourself with each marketplace’s policies and fees before deciding to work with them. For example, Sedo’s commission starts at 10% and BrandBucket prohibits listing the domain anywhere else if you’re selling with them. Here’s a list of the most popular marketplaces (in no particular order):
If you buy a domain from a 3rd party, the backlinks are valuable.  I always wait a few months before redirecting, so just set up a quick minisite until two page rank updates have passed and then go ahead and 301 redirect.  However, it seems that you'll get the link juice from the back links, the anchor text is ignored by Google.   Buying a domain at Godaddy TDName expired auctions, seem to not count as a dropped domain if you immediately set up a mini-site.
The great thing about this is that it’s kind of like a metasearch engine for all the places that you can find expired domains around the web. First, let’s look at deleted domains. Okay? To do that, you go click on the deleted domains button here and then click on any top level domain that you want to get. I prefer .com because it’s obviously the most common top level domain.
  Since starting SEO back in 2009, it has become very difficult to rank brand new domains. Unless you are building a brand, it's highly recommended that you start every new money site with an expired domain. Additionally, if you're building a PBN, you should only consider using expired domains. The problem is good domains start at $50 a piece, and anyone charging less is either full of sh*t or selling garbage domains, and I mean that. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. DomCop has a great offer that all of you buying expired domains should consider. For the price of a couple domain names, you can use DomCop for a month, snag some excellent domain names, which would otherwise cost you thousands of dollars. If you're considering expired domain software and don't have the knowledge to program your own crawler, I'd lean towards DomCop.   
Thanks for this post. I do good with Adsense and wanted to branch out so I bought 5 domains from Namejet after reading this thread. After the 5 auctions ended I spent $500 total. I contacted 30 people about these domains and after a few bites I was able to sell one of them for $500 so I got my money back and now what I sell the other four for is all profit. The best part about this is that it is not very time consuming. I spent maybe an hour on Namejet. I spent maybe two hours sending out emails. Thanks again!
Control your expectations and keep them based on facts, data and expert opinions. Use a tool like EstiBot to get a general idea of how much the domain may be worth. Do understand that this is an automated appraisal tool, so take those numbers with a grain of salt. However, it’s great to get you started. You can also use paid, human-based appraisal services from Sedo and other providers, but these can get costly. If you’re not careful, you could easily overspend on such services and then realize your domain may not even be worth the appraisal fee.

Adding domains to our Premium Listings on our website before you sell will give them more exposure to the community. We’ll offer an appraisal for your domain to give you an estimated selling price, and you can adjust that price at any time. We also offer a comprehensive breakdown of our commission rates for all premium listings, so you can easily understand the process.
As mentioned earlier, knowing the potential value of a domain name is an invaluable skill. By adhering to basic guidelines such as those I listed above and through some of your own research, you’ll be able to pick names that offer you a higher chance of flipping them more easily. Remember, a net profit of $100 is still a profit, you must start somewhere.
Really depends on whether you want it to be passively marketed or actively pitched to investors and buyers, as well as how fast you want it sold. It also depends on what you're selling. What you're selling is only worth ANYTHING if there is an interested buyer. And it's only worth what the buyer is willing to pay for it at the time you want to sell it, not what you currently owe on your RV. This is a common misperception among folks trying to value domains before sale - they pick some nebulous method of pricing it that is not based on the market or history or sector demand, but rather on what a vacation costs or how much they owe on their boat. Good luck with that. So it really depends. If you have something that you feel has demand, you'll potentially get a higher price for it by NOT needing to short sell it quickly for cash and being able to wait while a broker packages and pitches it. 60-90 days. That will always get a higher price than just listing it in a database and hoping someone will see it and be interested. The problem is, good brokers are few and you're going to need to see if they will represent you in the sale. If they don't believe they can sell it at all, or they don't believe they can sell it for what you owe on your boat, they'll decline your offer to do business with you because you're being unrealistic.
Length: This is pretty self-explanatory. Generally the shorter the domain name, the more valuable it is. This difference in value decreases exponentially as the name gets longer, though. For instance, the difference in price between 3 and 4 letter domains are significant, while the price difference between a 7 and 8 letter domain would usually be much less significant.
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