Official marketplaces offer a third possibility for domain traders to peddle their product. Domain marketplaces, such as Sedo, GoDaddy.com, or BuyDomains.com, connect potential buyers with domain holders hoping to sell their valuable virtual property. These platforms function as a kind of domain real estate agency and are known to sometimes demand high prices for their services.

Where do I start? So I heard about bitcoin and I know it’s all the craze nowadays. Let’s start from there. I’ll hop on Google Trends and type in “bitcoin”. Google Trends basically tracks the popularity of search queries over time, it’s often a goldmine for discovering currently exploding or soon-to-explode topics/terms..etc. So here’s what it looks like:
Then the number is an HRL so it’ll be quite a bit different then you’ll see an expired domains because domain pop service is not very good compared to HREFs. Usually this shows about 20 percent of the total lengths. This shows more like 80. Okay? As you can see it has actually 162 referring domains which is quite a lot better than we saw in expired domains.
Namejet is a domain clearing house (at least that is my term for it).  What happens is that people let their domain names expire everyday.  Some people just don’t need their domain anymore, some people forget to renew it, some people die, I mean there can be hundreds of reasons why a domain will not be renewed.  What the domain registrars want to do is cash in on the domain that someone forgot to renew, so they offer that domain to Namejet to auction it to the general public.  Think of it like a storage unit, someone doesn’t make their payment and the storage company hires an auctioneer to come and auction the storage unit to the general public.  Namejet is doing this but for domain names.  The bid for each domain starts at $69.  What I LOVE about Namejet is the process…  they let you search through the domains that are coming up for auction 30 days in advance.  Whoever places a $69 bid on a domain will be entered into an auction when the 30 days runs out with everyone else who placed a bid.  If you are the only bidder than you get the domain for $69.  If there are 10 other bidders than there is a closed auction, meaning only you 10 guys can bid now against each other in a 3 day auction with the highest bidder taking the domain when the clock strikes zero.  I love this because let’s say there is a great domain and it flies under the radar.  If it goes to auction with only 3 or 5 or 7 bidders my chances of winning this domain at a very low price are great.  I’ve won domains for $100 which I was able to flip for $2,000.  I won a domain for $2,500 which I flipped within 4 months  for $7,500.  I won a domain for $1,000 which I’ve turned down $5,000 offers on because I think I can get $10,000 for it.  The key is to not overpay in order to leave yourself plenty of room to turn a profit when you flip the domain.
Once you’ve settled on some domain name ideas, you can head over to a bulk domain search tool such as DynaDot’s to mass check all the names against different TLDs. When you’ve found one (or a few) good candidates, you can simply go ahead and register them for approximately $10 each. The next step would then be to market them. Then finally, it’s a waiting game.
As .COM is the natural domain extension for the United States based websites, it does get some priority in the Google.com’s search engine results (based on Google’s US datacenters) when competing against other countries’ domain extensions like .CO.UK, .CO.ZA, .COM.AU etc. However, .COMs don’t get automatic priority over other similar extensions like .ORG, .NET etc. that are also commonly used in the United States. All these domain extensions compete with .COMs on a level playing field.

If the third party in question does not have the trademark rights they claim, or it is not a very strong claim. In most cases, the third party will need their trademark registered with the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). The USPTO website has a trademark search engine that you can consult. This may also require a cybersquatting attorney to help determine if the trademark claim is strong enough.
The great thing about this is that it’s kind of like a metasearch engine for all the places that you can find expired domains around the web. First, let’s look at deleted domains. Okay? To do that, you go click on the deleted domains button here and then click on any top level domain that you want to get. I prefer .com because it’s obviously the most common top level domain.
Hi I totally agree with you Domaineer42. My partner and I are web developers and are seeing a lot of ‘hype’ selling and not enough ‘real value’ selling based on actual search engine criteria. Recently brokers have knocked back selling domains with great potential value based on some pie-in-the-sky logic, defying even Estibot values we’re told to use. The domains were not our best but with four figure value, according to Estibot, I thought it was a great start as a newbie to domaining. In an industry which should flourish, some of these domain ‘fashionistas’ are making rods for their own backs by devaluing domains that have REAL potential value based on customer search. I don’t understand what is going on, but I have decided to opt out for awhile. We have quite a few domains in our repository, with data backed search criteria, trending upwards. Will bring them out of the closet when the industry is ready to get real.
At the end of the day, the owner of this domain name let it expire and didn’t renew it. So while there may be many legit reasons as to why they might’ve done that, one of the not-very-legit reasons could be that the domain is “dead” in some way or another. In other words, it’s no longer useful for the original owner because of a penalty or otherwise. If so, it's unlikely it'll be of any use for you as well.
Then the number is an HRL so it’ll be quite a bit different then you’ll see an expired domains because domain pop service is not very good compared to HREFs. Usually this shows about 20 percent of the total lengths. This shows more like 80. Okay? As you can see it has actually 162 referring domains which is quite a lot better than we saw in expired domains.

In the past, expired domains were used as part of black hat SEO in order to generate backlink sources quickly and easily, and this practice is still used somewhat today. Getting links in this way is not a recommendable practice. All relevant search engines work nowadays with highly complex ranking algorithms, which can no longer be outsmarted by these link networks.


Official marketplaces offer a third possibility for domain traders to peddle their product. Domain marketplaces, such as Sedo, GoDaddy.com, or BuyDomains.com, connect potential buyers with domain holders hoping to sell their valuable virtual property. These platforms function as a kind of domain real estate agency and are known to sometimes demand high prices for their services.
Domains that are indexed on Google and highly ranked are particularly attractive to traders. Other SEO aspects, such as backlink profiles or the search volume of the keywords in domain names, also play a significant role in calculating thevalue. Design can also positively affect the price of a domain. Short and succinct names that are easy to remember are especially advantageous. Endings are further factors that should be taken into account. Top-level domains (TLDs) such as .com or .org are by far the most sought-after endings.

Just because something is legal does not make it ethical. While things that are legal can and often are ethical, there are practices like domain name flipping that are not ethical. Buying a domain name without intending to use it to make profit creates an unnecessary industry which costs people money and reduces general productivity and economic growth. This is the same with all practices that cost people money but do not contribute any value, most notably corruption. If we eliminated such practices our economic growth increases and general wealth is increased because our money is paying people for things that add to our lives and our communities. This does not. Evessariky reglect badly in people who choose to engage in such practices, but is a result of regulatory failure.
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There are many places and ways you can purchase domain names.  You can purchase unregistered ones through sites like GoDaddy.  There are forums where people will gladly try to sell you their domain name (usually though the domains being sold in forums are either crap or the asking price is so high it does not allow you any room to flip the domain).  And then there is my favorite way of obtaining domain names, through an online auction at Namejet.  Let’s first talk about Namejet and then we’ll talk about how I personally ring the register by flipping domains.
Yandex replaced TCI with SQI (Site Quality Index). SQI looks similar to TCI, so I re-used the old TCI field, however all values are now the new SQI. Not all domains are checked yet, but all that had TCI > 0, are now switched to SQI and all newly added domains are also checked for SQI (starting today). Updating all domains will take a couple months.
As people who normally use internet only to check emails, shop, tweet, upload pictures, update facebook status or conduct some business, a large majority of us remain oblivious to the domain name and domain flipping industry. So, when we do decide to venture into it for some reason, it is only natural for us to carry some commonly known myths associated with it. It can also be easier than building a website from a scratch. Although with easy to follow guides relating to how to create a blog – many are choosing to go down this route and add value to their domain names rather than selling undeveloped.
Here's a test I have in process.  I bought an old $5 closeout domain from Godaddy TDname expired auction.  I put a quick minisite up and linked to it with a crazy anchor text phrase.  The domain is ranking for that crazy term now.  It's gone through one pagerank update and I'm waiting for a second to come.  Then I'll redirect the domain to another minisite.  I suspect the second site won't rank for the anhor text, but we'll see.  
So, you paste the domain into here and click on the search domains button. This will show you more information about the pending delete status domain. In this case, you have to order by June 13th and today is the 10th. So, you have three days and you just add it to your cart as if you’re just buying anything online. Just check it off and click add to cart. It’s added to your cart and they will try to get it on your behalf.

Karn Jajoo heads the premium names program for Radix’s domain extensions: .WEBSITE, .PRESS, .HOST, .SPACE, .SITE, .TECH, .ONLINE, .STORE & .FUN. Radix has made more than $1.75 million in premium domains revenue in 2017 thus far, including the biggest nTLD sale of all times — casino.online, and the sale of business.site to Google for it’s free website builder, Google My Business. Karn considers himself a new gTLD evangelist and has had articles published in The Next Web, Website Magazine, & CMO.com.
Keyword relevancy is not the only thing that matters when it comes to SEO. However, domain names that were previously used by other businesses usually have a lot of backlinks and a decent ranking on PageRank. Even though such domain names are usually about to expire, they are still worth a lot of money if they have a good number of backlinks and a ranking of five or more.
Once you have a name in mind, how do you know if the price is fair? I like to use namebio.com to compare the domain I’m thinking about buying with similar domains that have sold. You can enter the keyword and also use some advanced search features to see a list of names similar to yours, what they actually sold for, and when they sold. You can also research current domain sales on venues like GoDaddy Auctions and Afternic. Finally, Ron Jackson issues a weekly report on DN Journal that covers the top public sales of the week. You can use all these resources to help you price your domains correctly.
Hi Kulwant, these are great tips as usual. I particularly like the way to tell us to check the google pagerank in case the domain has been banned – that could lower the usefulness of the domain quite a bit. One thing though, don’t you think that buying domains is sometimes immoral? Like sometimes you accidentally buy a domain of somebody elses website who forgot to renew.
Now, a lot of times these great domains that have pending delete will get snapped up in a flash. Okay? You want to use the same system that’s 500,000 domains so you can always sort them by whatever you want to do to make sure you’re only looking at quality domains and look at the link profile the same way. Once you find one that you like, you can’t just sit on your computer at Go Daddy and wait for it drop on 6/14 and expect to get it because there’s going to be a lot of other people gunning for that domain. You actually have to use a service like Snap Name.
Just because someone spent five or six figure amount on a domain name doesn’t automatically imply that he/she’ll spend the same or at least a few thousand dollars on a similar name too. Basing your domain flipping strategy entirely on what others have just bought may not be as useful as you may think. Every domain name has a story behind it and its purchase/sale is usually as unique as that story.
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@ib2 @T-3D I've been a domain investor for over 10 years and have been very successful at it. There's a lot more that goes into it then just registering a domain name and hoping it will sell. You can list your domains on Godaddy auction listings or on premium listings, I've had a lot of success with those. Some good resources are namebio.com, dnjournal.com, namepros.com and others.
They see a domain’s price tag and they can instantly tell whether it’s under or overvalued. This is probably the most important skill one should have in this industry. Neil Patel has an interesting related quote: “The most important thing to remember when buying sites is that you always make money on the buy, never the sell.” In order to successfully do this, you must be able to spot undervalued domains. This is what will ultimately translate for you into a handsome profit margin when you get the opportunity to resell the domain for its “real value”.
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