When I first started online, I'd register domains that I thought I could develop and sell at a later time. After learning my way around the cloud, I realized many of the domains I'd registered are pretty much useless, or so I thought, and I let them expire. Come to find out several of these domains have been picked up by parking sites and are being offered for sale for thousands of dollars! Now I'm not saying they're actually selling for the asking price, but I learned my lesson. I never allow a domain name to expire. I add content to it, backlinks, some AdSense and try to sell it for something.

With over 25 million .com domains registered with Google alone, this top-level domain is by far the most popular choice worldwide. According to the domain marketplace Sedo, in 2015 the average sales price for a .com domain name was over £3000. The most expensive publicly traded domain names have been known to fetch eight-figures sums. But don’t quit your day job just yet: such sales are the exception rather than the rule.


Yes, buying existing domain names can be profitable too. Existing domains with a potential for profit can be found using Sedo. Make sure you pick domain names that have good traffic, backlinks and Google PageRank under 17 characters. Also, steer clear of existing domain names containing special characters or numbers because they are not likely to be sold.
Just like a property listing, except much simpler, domain marketplaces are basically massive lists of domain names that are up for sale. The process of using them is simple. Buy a domain and park it, then list your domain on the marketplace for a price you’re willing to let it go for. Once the domain is sold, the marketplace takes a cut and then passes on the remaining funds to you.
Prospective buyers can contact domain holders directly in cases where the desired domain is no longer available. Most registries openly publish the names and contact data of domain holders. Once this information is gained, buyers can get in touch with domain holders and make them an offer for the name. Sales are also known to occur even when the original domain owner may necessarily have never had any prior commercial ambitions
If you buy keyword specific domains, you're really buying the type in traffic.  I use the URL builder and redirect through that URL so you can see how much traffic your getting from the keyword domain.  There seems to be no rythme or reason to what keyword domains deliver traffic and what don't.  By tracking traffic with the Google URL builder you get a feel for what names are giving you traffic and which are not. ie. the plural, the singular, two words, three words, the possessive, etc.

I’m new to flipping domain. Like other newbie there are lots of questions that comes out to my mind. When I read your article, the first questions pops up to my mind is.. how to find the buyer for the domain? I have a lists of good domains that I keep. Actually, I have a .info name and the .com of its version is sold at afternic at $16,000. I never thought that the .com of my .info domain has sold that high. I heard lots of .info domain has been sold quite a little, now my problem is how do I sell my .info domain? I was left confused with domain marketplace like sedo, afternic, and others. I want my domain sold like others did on their .info domain. Has any of you can help me? Anyway, my domain was registered 2 – 3 weeks from now and domain is about selling ” ” online.


What if we replace “bitcoin” with “ripple” in all these examples? SellRipple.com? RippleGiftCards.com? Ripple.network? Ripple.us…etc. You get the picture. There are a 100 of these on NameBio + the keywords we got from the Google Keyword Planner, that’s hundreds of potential high-value domains right there. The thing is, we’re only scratching the surface here. According to Wikipedia, there are over 1,300 cryptocurrencies online as of January 2018.
If you are looking to sell a domain name that is no longer of use to you, a possibility would be to lease it through a third-party company such as Godaddy, which lists tens of thousands of names. If the name is a quality one, there are also premium agents such as MediaOptions, which deals with more selective domain names. An alternative option would be to lease it out on platforms such as Nameforest.com. Doing so will save you the time of having to find potential buyers, and will guarantee a higher success rate than attempting to look for a purchaser on your own.

Let’s play this out with a real example. Say you’re familiar with the real estate market in Tempe, Ariz., and you have the opportunity to purchase tempeapartments.com for $200. This might be a good deal. Tempe has a lot of rental property; it’s  a competitive market; and there’s ample turnover in the apartment space because the city is home to a major university. Ask yourself:
I have one domain name which I never used it and it has .com and I later discovered there is another company with similar name but with .net and they are doing good as once they approached me to sell them my .com which I never did as I had plan to start something which didn’t materialize . its been 11 years now I have maintained the name now I have two options.
Those trading domains for commercial purposes are generally on the prowl for lucrative domain endings. There are essentially two different ways traders go about making money off of domain names. One method entails purchasing already established names for a low price and selling them for a profit later once their value has increased. Another strategy involves buying and registering a domain that is thought to possess a high sales potential. Many domain traders use backorder services. These services automatically register a domain when one becomes available or is deleted (what are known as expired domains).
What if we replace “bitcoin” with “ripple” in all these examples? SellRipple.com? RippleGiftCards.com? Ripple.network? Ripple.us…etc. You get the picture. There are a 100 of these on NameBio + the keywords we got from the Google Keyword Planner, that’s hundreds of potential high-value domains right there. The thing is, we’re only scratching the surface here. According to Wikipedia, there are over 1,300 cryptocurrencies online as of January 2018.
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