1) pending delete auctions.  These are domains that were not renewed and are going through a pretty complicated drop process.  You can backorder these names at the auction venues and then each attempts to "catch" the dropping domain.  If one is successful you win the domain at $59 if you're the only one to backorder the name.  If more than one person backordered the domain a 3 day private auction is held.  Once the domain goes through the drop process, the back links have pretty much zero SEO benifit to the new domain owner.
Here's an old post on search engine roundtable that claims google's policy is to discount previous backlink juice when a domain changes ownership.  I'm not convinced whether this is actually true or something Google says to discourage excessive domain buying / 301 redirecting for SEO benefit.  The comments above seem to give varying opinions on this matter. Would be great to get to the bottom of that one!
Instead of focusing on one domain name to sell quickly, try selling large volumes of domain names over longer periods of time. While this may require a more substantial investment, it will also return a greater profit in the long term. Remember, if you follow the basic principles of domain name speculation, there is good chance that your domain names will sell eventually.
Check backlink profile: If you’re not familiar with what backlinks are, they’re basically any public website that “links” to the domain in question. Since there are numerous shady tactics in the SEO world, expired domains’ backlink profiles should be examined carefully. Check if too many links are coming from the same domain or if links have weird anchor texts/use foreign languages. You can use a tool such as ahrefs for these purposes.
Once you get to this point you know there have been DMAS listed. They have a number of domains linking to them and according to the way back machine which is WBY, you can see their site age. So, if you want to go with an older site you can see right here whether or not this is a site that you might be interested in, but before pulling the trigger you do want to check two things.
There are currently two main types of domain speculators: those that buy domains, build sites around them, and then flip the domain and accompanying website, and then there are those that buy and sell domain names without web sites attached. While both can be very lucrative businesses, the second type is much easier for novices to learn, and as such, shall be the topic of discussion for this article. 
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What I like to do is sort by DP which stands for domain pop, and this is basically the number of linking root domains. So, BL is the number of back links. As you know that can be somewhat misleading if they have a lot of site wide links or multiple links from the same domain. I like to sort by domain pop. What that does is it brings up the sites with the most amount of referring domains.
Think of ways that the domains you buy would be a valuable asset to the buyer. Picture someone who would benefit from buying the domain in a space you are very familiar with. If this was you and someone was trying to sell you this name, would it be beneficial for you to own? Be honest. If so, why? If not, why? Use those answers to refine your search for names.
While numbers like the ones seen above are impressive, most domains sell for significantly less extravagant prices and are generally in the two or three-digit range. Not long ago, those who were able to secure general terms (like icecream.com or pizza.com) not protected by trademark rights often found themselves sitting on virtual gold mines. The glory days of this boom have long since passed, and those looking for a profit in today’s market need a keen sense for coming trends.

Once you’ve settled on some domain name ideas, you can head over to a bulk domain search tool such as DynaDot’s to mass check all the names against different TLDs. When you’ve found one (or a few) good candidates, you can simply go ahead and register them for approximately $10 each. The next step would then be to market them. Then finally, it’s a waiting game.
I've fixed some speed related problems and the new search cluster is now live. The combination of both speeds up every search noticeably. Also some unfinished expired lists are no longer in the domain name search. Some users noticed that you could already find TLDs in the domain name search that were not released yet. This is not possible anymore, however if you are one of those users, contact me. Let me know what TLD you are interested in and I will prioritize it.
With over 25 million .com domains registered with Google alone, this top-level domain is by far the most popular choice worldwide. According to the domain marketplace Sedo, the average sales price for a .com domain name during the second quarter of 2015 was 4,701 dollars. The most expensive publicly traded domain names have been known to fetch eight-figures. But don’t quit your day job just yet: such sales are the exception rather than the rule.
Let’s just say for example we wanted this site, crystalgiftsworld.com. It looked good based on our analysis and we’d head over to Snap Names, Nameja is another one and what these service do is they have special technology on their site that allows them to try  to register a domain on your behalf over and over again. Okay? If you tried to do that your IP would get banned, but they have some system where they know how to do it just enough to get the domain, but not enough to get blacklisted.

I am really new to all this. I am about to launch my blog in the next week. I have a domain and a wordpress blog set ready to go. Clearly it will have no traffic from day one and I guess it will take a while to build up. So my question is would you advise a begginer like me to stick with the one blog for a while and build it up. Or is it worth investing the time early on to master how to find expired domains and link them to the blog?

I remember the glory days of the Internet where people did make a ton of money buying domain names. Until I came across this post I actually didn't even realize that people actually still thought they could.make.a.lot of money by doing this. I have some domains that people would be interested in buying and I get contacted about them but mostly it is for people wanting to purchase them for like $1200. And for that price I would rather just hang on to the domain name. I also get contacted by a lot of people offering to sell me complimentary domain names at what I would call ridiculous premiums. The knew google is all about branding. I would consider paying for a domain name that has a great brand attached to it but I could care less about most keyword rich domain names. Of course there are always exceptions.
Finally, you want to head over to domaintools.com. Then put the domain into here. What this will do is it’ll show you the history of the domain, because a lot of times these domains have been dropped like four or five times and a lot of people in SEO feel this way. I’m not sure about it. If a domain has been dropped several times, then Google does actually devalue the links pointing to that domain. So, as you can see I just changed registrars a few times and it hasn’t been dropped or else it’ll say one drops or two drops.

There’s an important distinction to make here between domain flipping and website flipping. The latter mainly refers to buying and selling full websites. By full websites, I mean websites that actually have content and more often than not have traffic and revenue. When buying and selling websites, the domain name matters less as the main value there is the content, traffic, revenue, history/reputation, sustainability and growth opportunities. The same can’t be said for domain names where you’re just selling “the name” and hence it’s all that really matters.

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