There are many places and ways you can purchase domain names.  You can purchase unregistered ones through sites like GoDaddy.  There are forums where people will gladly try to sell you their domain name (usually though the domains being sold in forums are either crap or the asking price is so high it does not allow you any room to flip the domain).  And then there is my favorite way of obtaining domain names, through an online auction at Namejet.  Let’s first talk about Namejet and then we’ll talk about how I personally ring the register by flipping domains.

There are many places and ways you can purchase domain names.  You can purchase unregistered ones through sites like GoDaddy.  There are forums where people will gladly try to sell you their domain name (usually though the domains being sold in forums are either crap or the asking price is so high it does not allow you any room to flip the domain).  And then there is my favorite way of obtaining domain names, through an online auction at Namejet.  Let’s first talk about Namejet and then we’ll talk about how I personally ring the register by flipping domains.
If you are feeling ambitious, you can link each of your domain names to its matching “buy it now” purchase page at one of the marketplaces. Another more sophisticated option would be to “park” your domain with one of the leading domain parking companies, such as DomainSponsor or SmartName and enable their built-in “for sale” message and contact mechanisms.
Know your rights under the Anti-cyber squatting Consumer Protection Act (ACPA). This is the main federal law that deals with domain name trademark disputes. These distinctions are still a legal gray area, and being able to make these claims is no guarantee you will win a case. You should consult with a copyright lawyer to help determine the validity of your defense. If you are accused of cybersquatting, you may be able to keep your domain if you can make any of the following defenses in court:
Hi thanks a lot for this. I appreciate your honesty. A lot of people need to hear this. I needed this to. When buying and flipping domains always ask yourself who would actually buy this domain, what they can do with this domain and how would you monetize this domain if you bought it. Always think of your customer and treat it as a business. I think you’ll avoid a great deal of dissapointment down the line. Thank you
Length: This is pretty self-explanatory. Generally the shorter the domain name, the more valuable it is. This difference in value decreases exponentially as the name gets longer, though. For instance, the difference in price between 3 and 4 letter domains are significant, while the price difference between a 7 and 8 letter domain would usually be much less significant.
I’m new to flipping domain. Like other newbie there are lots of questions that comes out to my mind. When I read your article, the first questions pops up to my mind is.. how to find the buyer for the domain? I have a lists of good domains that I keep. Actually, I have a .info name and the .com of its version is sold at afternic at $16,000. I never thought that the .com of my .info domain has sold that high. I heard lots of .info domain has been sold quite a little, now my problem is how do I sell my .info domain? I was left confused with domain marketplace like sedo, afternic, and others. I want my domain sold like others did on their .info domain. Has any of you can help me? Anyway, my domain was registered 2 – 3 weeks from now and domain is about selling ” ” online.
Flipping domains are similar to flipping houses in real estate: You buy a property with potential, improve it, and then sell quickly for twice the profit (or more). Between 2005 and 2012, internet marketers had been obsessed with flipping domains… and for good reason. Many were successful at buying plain old domain names, spicing them up with keyword-stuffed content, giving them much-needed traffic, and then selling them off to the highest bidder. But in 2017, can this still be a viable online business?
The "Domain Lists" and the "TLDs" filter are now static and not created dynamic based on the current search. Turns out creating these 2 filters dynamically was slowing down the search tremendously. It even made certain requests impossible. For example now you can do a dot search that affects all .com domains and get a result with over 150mio domains in reasonable time. I'm also working on a new search cluster that will make searching even faster (not released yet).

What if we replace “bitcoin” with “ripple” in all these examples? SellRipple.com? RippleGiftCards.com? Ripple.network? Ripple.us…etc. You get the picture. There are a 100 of these on NameBio + the keywords we got from the Google Keyword Planner, that’s hundreds of potential high-value domains right there. The thing is, we’re only scratching the surface here. According to Wikipedia, there are over 1,300 cryptocurrencies online as of January 2018.
I've fixed some speed related problems and the new search cluster is now live. The combination of both speeds up every search noticeably. Also some unfinished expired lists are no longer in the domain name search. Some users noticed that you could already find TLDs in the domain name search that were not released yet. This is not possible anymore, however if you are one of those users, contact me. Let me know what TLD you are interested in and I will prioritize it.

Hey, what’s up everybody. It’s Brian Dean from Quick Sprout. In this video, I’m going to show you how to buy affordable expired domains and how to evaluate the potential value that an expired domain could bring to your site. Now, expired domains is pretty gray hat, black hat type of thing because there’s basically two things you’re going to do in an expired domain.

Since the Buyer pays Escrow.com and not the Seller, Escrow.com can withhold payment until we're satisfied the domain name has been transferred by the Seller. One of the ways Escrow.com does this is by checking the WHOIS database of the appropriate Registrar to make certain it properly reflects the new Buyer's name as the domain name Registrant. Once this has been verified, Escrow.com releases payment to the Seller.
The term flipping implies a sale that is done in a flip, or in a quick and sudden manner. You cannot be considered a domain flipper if all you do is just list your domain names and wait for years for them to sell. At its core, domain flipping is about spotting the right opportunities at the right time, involving strategic buying and selling of websites for profit.
Finally, we’ll look at a bit of a different animal in the expired domains world and that’s pending delete. To do that just click on the pending delete button which is right next to the Go Daddy Auction’s button. What this does is it shows you domains that aren’t quite deleted yet. So, they’re right before they get into this deleted category in expired domains. They’re going to be deleted, so they haven’t been renewed by whoever registered them, so they’re going to get dropped.
You can still buy two word or three word domain names incorporating your target keywords. Moreover, there are millions of domain names out there which haven’t been used at all and are bound to expire soon. All such domains keep coming back to the domain marketplace. What more, there are useful tools available to research and filter through such expired domains.
In the past, expired domains were used as part of black hat SEO in order to generate backlink sources quickly and easily, and this practice is still used somewhat today. Getting links in this way is not a recommendable practice. All relevant search engines work nowadays with highly complex ranking algorithms, which can no longer be outsmarted by these link networks.
You can find the new fields in the Column Manager and the Majestic Filter Tab. Majestic Crawled URLs, Information about the Outbound Links of the Domain and Information about the types of Incoming Links (follow, homepage, ...). Also you can now see the detected language for the website (or previous website) on the domain and the language of the anchor text links referring to the domain. The filter for the website language only includes values with at least 20% and the filter for anchor texts only with at least 10%. When you hover over the column, you still see all values (even lower percentages), but lower values are not used for the filter. If you only want to see domains matching the majority language, use the "majority language" filter. Unfortunately that filter doesn't work in the domain name search

Unfortunately, you probably won't like my tips. You need to look for quality domains at a good price and be willing to hold on to them to get your money back or know when you've invested wrong and get rid of them. Quality is in the eye of the holder, and believe me, I've looked at plenty of domain portfolios that the owner just knew were million dollar domains but in my opinion, they'd be hard pressed to get anyone to take them off their hands for just the registration costs. You have to figure that most of the best .com domains were registered in the 90's, and those are the ones you typically see the 6-7+ figure sale prices on. I'm not saying there isn't money to be made because there is. But it does take time, research and money, and maybe in some cases a little bit of luck. If you're thinking of getting into the industry, I recommend digging into the resources provided by Michael Cyger on http://domainsherpa.com and from there, moving to some of the other big blogs such as TheDomains.com or
If you are looking to monetize an idle domain, looking to third-party platforms would be a good idea. Many of these platforms such as Nameforest ourselves will create a logo alongside your domain, which will be added to the list of preexisting domains on their sites. This is useful as the demand for your domain will also be greatly increased after it is rented as opposed to a domain that leads to a blank site - thus making it easier for you to find a potential buyer.
Also with the domains, a name which can be cheap for one can be worth gold for the other. Permute the letters in your domain name and try contacting and eventually selling out to organizations that run under those names or contain the letters within. Companies would be keenly interested in buying out the domain names that matches the product's name. Hint : Look for companies on LinkedIn
Mr. Dabir as far as my knowledge is concerned such media oriented names are of premium category and may seek higher value. I was acquainted with discussions going on regarding primarily hindi language entertainment platform called http://hindi.media and the dealing was of higher end hence expect it to be in several thousands bucks. Any inferior expectation may beget only disappointment.
When done right, the domain trade is an enterprise that lends itself to particularly lucrative deals. The tactic is simple: domain names are purchased with the prospect of reselling them for a wide profit margin. But the trick of this trade lies in securing domains that may later be valuable to well-endowed buyers, such as a large company. We have laid out all the important facts and terms on the topic, including some of the highest sale prices on record for a publicly traded .com domain.

There is NO accurate way to predict the sale of digital assets – if someone wants it, they’ll buy it. For example, those wasting their money on useless .com’s (LLLL’s that have no rhyme or reason) will spend 3x more time and money optimizing their useless name as someone that buys ANY keyword loaded domain (regardless if a TLD or new one). But these individuals who are spending thousands on domains will eventually get stuck with these domains in favor of (you guessed it) the oft forgotten yet highly useful 1-3 keyword domains. Why? Study Google’s algorithm as I have for over a decade, and you’ll figure it out.

@ib2 @T-3D I've been a domain investor for over 10 years and have been very successful at it. There's a lot more that goes into it then just registering a domain name and hoping it will sell. You can list your domains on Godaddy auction listings or on premium listings, I've had a lot of success with those. Some good resources are namebio.com, dnjournal.com, namepros.com and others.

Before EmpireFlippers became a website broker, the internet marketing duo Joe Magnotti and Justin Cooke had been sharing how they flip sites for cash on their widely-popular blog and podcasts. They relocated to the Philippines, hired locals to create content and build traffic, and then literally built hundreds of niche sites that earn from either AdSense ads or Amazon affiliate commissions. Every month, they chose low-earners and sold these ready-made sites on their marketplace.
In theory, you could technically acquire a domain for $10,000 and be able to sell it for $100,000. You could also acquire a domain for $10 and be able to sell it for $100,000, $10,000… or $100, you get the picture. Because of this, it’s hard to recommend a perfect starting budget because your strategy, experience, and the pace at which you learn will hugely affect your buying and selling decisions.
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