Thanks for this post. I do good with Adsense and wanted to branch out so I bought 5 domains from Namejet after reading this thread. After the 5 auctions ended I spent $500 total. I contacted 30 people about these domains and after a few bites I was able to sell one of them for $500 so I got my money back and now what I sell the other four for is all profit. The best part about this is that it is not very time consuming. I spent maybe an hour on Namejet. I spent maybe two hours sending out emails. Thanks again!
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Yandex replaced TCI with SQI (Site Quality Index). SQI looks similar to TCI, so I re-used the old TCI field, however all values are now the new SQI. Not all domains are checked yet, but all that had TCI > 0, are now switched to SQI and all newly added domains are also checked for SQI (starting today). Updating all domains will take a couple months.
Think of ways that the domains you buy would be a valuable asset to the buyer. Picture someone who would benefit from buying the domain in a space you are very familiar with. If this was you and someone was trying to sell you this name, would it be beneficial for you to own? Be honest. If so, why? If not, why? Use those answers to refine your search for names.
There is NO accurate way to predict the sale of digital assets – if someone wants it, they’ll buy it. For example, those wasting their money on useless .com’s (LLLL’s that have no rhyme or reason) will spend 3x more time and money optimizing their useless name as someone that buys ANY keyword loaded domain (regardless if a TLD or new one). But these individuals who are spending thousands on domains will eventually get stuck with these domains in favor of (you guessed it) the oft forgotten yet highly useful 1-3 keyword domains. Why? Study Google’s algorithm as I have for over a decade, and you’ll figure it out.
Some buyers are a tough nut to crack and they may quote a ridiculously low offer. Explain to these buyers and convince them why the domain is worth more than the quote. If the potential buyer doesn’t agree, fret not, just move on to the next one until you find a willing buyer. Once you finalize the deal, then it’s time to find the best payment mode for the transaction.
In today's SEO (2015) the answer would be a big no! With changes to the google algorithm and the constant updates panda, penguin, what's next...., much of the "keyword url" power is now gone. While there was a day when it made sense to buy a good named .com and expect instant indexing, not so anymore unless the site is very strong coming in ,which in that case you'll drop a minimum $50k. If you are willing to drop that kind of money and the site has a high domain authority, it might make sense as long as it matches whatever product or service that you're trying to sell. Just my opinion...
Referring domains for anchor phrases usually reveals similar information. What you really want to look out for is whether or not the site has been picked up by a spammer in the past. A lot of times these expired domains were dropped, picked up by a website owner who then tried to rank it for keywords like Viagra, Cialis and whatever. You obviously don’t want that kind of domain.
The truth is that you require at least one year’s time to get around only the basics of the domain flipping business, leave alone making huge money from it. During this time, you’ll make several mistakes, buy useless domain names, lose out prospective deals and much more. Domain flipping is far from any get rich quick method. If overnight results are what you’re after, domain investing may not be your piece of cake. This business involves a real and steep learning curve which many people find difficult to climb.

I like to also click on the No Fake PR’s and No Unsure PR’s because a lot of fake page rank or page rank that’s been manipulated in the past and you want to make sure any authority that you see is real. Once you’ve picked all the criteria you want to choose, click on the apply filter button. This took our list from two million to 237. Now, even within that, that’s kind of overwhelming.
The less tech-savvy population on the internet is not fully aware of what the term ‘domain flipping’ means. If you are one of them, then this article is definitely a must-read for you. In this article, we will delve into the details of what ‘domain flipping’ refers to, how it is done, and whether it is a profitable part-time business opportunity or not.
Domain names are hot commodities in today's tech-centric world. The $16 million sale of 'insure.com' to Quinstreet in 2009 may have set the world record, but even lengthier domain names are routinely sold for hundreds of dollars every day. The result is a unique opportunity for investors to invest in domain names that can be sold for a profit in the future.

What DomCop does for you, is show you a list of all these domains along with important metrics for every domain. These metrics, along with our powerful filtering and sorting capabilities, will help reduce the size of the daily list from 200,000+ to just a handful of the very best domains. What would take you hours, will now literally take you seconds to do.


What is a domain? Despite this word being mentioned so frequently, it’s often unclear what the functions and structures of domains are. Knowing the hierarchical structure of the Domain Name System (DNS) is fundamental for anyone working in IT or in any online industry. We explain the difference between top-level, second-level, and third-level domains, and how you can benefit from subdomains that...
There are many places and ways you can purchase domain names.  You can purchase unregistered ones through sites like GoDaddy.  There are forums where people will gladly try to sell you their domain name (usually though the domains being sold in forums are either crap or the asking price is so high it does not allow you any room to flip the domain).  And then there is my favorite way of obtaining domain names, through an online auction at Namejet.  Let’s first talk about Namejet and then we’ll talk about how I personally ring the register by flipping domains.
Just like a property listing, except much simpler, domain marketplaces are basically massive lists of domain names that are up for sale. The process of using them is simple. Buy a domain and park it, then list your domain on the marketplace for a price you’re willing to let it go for. Once the domain is sold, the marketplace takes a cut and then passes on the remaining funds to you.
A good majority of web developers view the domain flipping industry with disdain as they face a hard time finding the right domain names for their own development projects. Domain flipping is also looked down upon by corporate and business entities who register multiple domains related to their trademarks or business names. Actually, it is these people who’re the real domain name squatters!
Instead of focusing on one domain name to sell quickly, try selling large volumes of domain names over longer periods of time. While this may require a more substantial investment, it will also return a greater profit in the long term. Remember, if you follow the basic principles of domain name speculation, there is good chance that your domain names will sell eventually.
In addition to the quantity of incoming links, the quality of them also needs to be accessed. The main issues here are: where does the link come from? What kind of link is it? A high quality backlink profile is usually made up of different link types such as footer and sidebar links, links in comments, forum threads, and social media posts, as well as content links that come from other similar websites. It’s necessary to find out whether these links are marked as follow or nofollow.
Simply put, domain flipping is the process of acquiring a domain name with a motive of selling it at a higher cost to someone else. This is very similar to flipping houses or cars, the only difference being that you can’t do much to increase the value of the asset by ‘fixing it up’ and then turning it over for a quick buck. Acquiring a valuable domain name before it is tagged with a premium price is the key to a successful domain flip. Raymond Hackney, a domain investor and consultant, successfully flipped a .website domain (his first on a new domain extension) for a decent profit. Read all about it here.

If you are feeling ambitious, you can link each of your domain names to its matching “buy it now” purchase page at one of the marketplaces. Another more sophisticated option would be to “park” your domain with one of the leading domain parking companies, such as DomainSponsor or SmartName and enable their built-in “for sale” message and contact mechanisms.

There's a lot of guesswork that goes into domain name investing. It's not enough to purchase domain names that are currently popular. Just like a stock, coming too late to the game won't be profitable. You have to think of the future, instead. What domain names might be profitable in the future? Is there a new product or service that may become a huge hit? Where is the future headed?
Current Craze: When PokémonGo was HUGE last year, my domain flipping friends (Matt of Handshakin.com is one) were all about buying domains like PokeStopNearMe(.com) and other related domains associated with the PokémonGo craziness. It’s like the day trading of the domain world. You’re buying domains during the hype and hope to sell them for a higher price quickly before the hype fades.
Link popularity: the link popularity is a parameter that is used to quantitatively evaluate incoming links to a website. This is measured depending on the number of links to a domain according to the mantra 'the more incoming links, the more important the site'. Link popularity is generally determined by the PageRank algorithm. The PageRank only plays a minor role in determining the domain’s relevance.
Yes, we port in all of the domains from NameJet, SnapNames, etc. There are a lot of great deals to be found. Some are absolute trash of course but if you can sift through them and put some time in (hopefully that is what we are trying to do with our tools is save time and give some value add with the SEO metrics, alerts, etc.) then you can find some great bargains.
Domain names comprising of a keyword have long since been regarded as a strong pointer when it comes to search engine ranking. This connection has been proven true over time. Nevertheless, keyword domains are still popular in the domain market. One reason for this is that keyword domains are seen by potential visitors as more relevant and are therefore taken more seriously. Catchy URLs containing strong search-volume keywords are therefore often monitored by potential customers over the years. It only makes sense to purchase an expired domain when the domain name coincides with the content, products, or services that you plan to offer with that address in the future.
Timothy Shim is a writer, editor, and tech geek. Starting his career in the field of Information Technology, he rapidly found his way into print and has since worked with International, regional and domestic media titles including ComputerWorld, PC.com, Business Today, and The Asian Banker. His expertise lies in the field of technology from both consumer as well as enterprise points of view.
Buying domains or registering domains–what’s the difference? There are many ways to acquire a domain. While available domains can be registered with any domain provider, rights of use from already-registered domains have to be purchased from their current owners. You can find different market places and auction platforms online that are tailored to these purposes. This kind of domain trade is...
When you backorder the domain it will say how long you have to place your bid in. Let’s say it says 25 days. If the domain is from one of Namejet’s partners then the auction will start in 2-3 days. If this is an expiring domain and Namejet has to catch it there is a chance they won’t catch it in which case it won’t go to auction at Namejet. If they do catch it then 2-3 days before the auction starts.
Where do I start? So I heard about bitcoin and I know it’s all the craze nowadays. Let’s start from there. I’ll hop on Google Trends and type in “bitcoin”. Google Trends basically tracks the popularity of search queries over time, it’s often a goldmine for discovering currently exploding or soon-to-explode topics/terms..etc. So here’s what it looks like:
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