Adding domains to our Premium Listings on our website before you sell will give them more exposure to the community. We’ll offer an appraisal for your domain to give you an estimated selling price, and you can adjust that price at any time. We also offer a comprehensive breakdown of our commission rates for all premium listings, so you can easily understand the process.
There comes a time in the life of every domain when its ownership must transfer hands. The reasons for selling a domain can vary greatly; maybe the company is no longer being in business, or the domain was bought in bulk and never used. If you're looking to offload your extra domains to make some spare cash, or if you're sitting on a premium domain name worth a goldmine, see Step 1 below to learn how to sell it.

You can’t tell us (with a straight face) that aged dictionary word .net and .org domains won’t sell easily. The .net extension is technically OLDER than .com, and holds an equally intrinsic value to that of its .com counterpart. These LLLL .com’s that are just letters slapped together may be cute to look at and easy to sell, but in the eyes of Google, ANY aged domain that makes sense (i.e. a dictionary word) is going to be much easier to rank for than some acronym or hodgepodge .com…and at the end of the day, that holds more value than whatever society sees in these nonsensical “wqij.com” names.
While numbers like the ones seen above are impressive, most domains sell for significantly less extravagant prices and are generally in the two or three-digit range. Not long ago, those who were able to secure general terms (like icecream.com or pizza.com) not protected by trademark rights often found themselves sitting on virtual gold mines. The glory days of this boom have long since passed, and those looking for a profit in today’s market need a keen sense for coming trends.
While getting a new domain name will give your site a clean slate and allow you to start a fresh marketing campaign, you may not be aware of the fact that some expired domains come with a high Page Rank value. A company that buys such a domain will not have to work so hard on website promotion and backlink building techniques. Thanks for updating this really informative post!
Building a solid domain portfolio is not a piece of cake; it may take you several months or years to achieve this goal but it will definitely be worth it in the end. When you are in the fishing phase, look at the potential of the domain name. Another common strategy used by seasoned domain flippers is to get hold of some high profile domain names and sit on them until they soar in terms of value.
You can still buy two word or three word domain names incorporating your target keywords. Moreover, there are millions of domain names out there which haven’t been used at all and are bound to expire soon. All such domains keep coming back to the domain marketplace. What more, there are useful tools available to research and filter through such expired domains.

I've seen some people comment about losing the link value of domains that have expired and picked up, but what about non-expired domains?  Let's say a competitor is going out of business and they still have a year or two left, and we buy their domain and site.  Is there a risk changing registrant info and registrars, even if I keep their site up and mostly the same as before?  I was under the impression that I'd want to keep it under their name so as not to hit the uber-reset button on the domain's inbound link value.
There are currently two main types of domain speculators: those that buy domains, build sites around them, and then flip the domain and accompanying website, and then there are those that buy and sell domain names without web sites attached. While both can be very lucrative businesses, the second type is much easier for novices to learn, and as such, shall be the topic of discussion for this article. 
Think about things like contractor.com or oranges.com. The more generic you go, the better off you will be. Why? Research has shown that Google likes generic names, so any company selling oranges may, for example, want the oranges.com domain name. If you own that name, you can set the asking price for it. Sounds great, right? There arejust a few things you have to think about first.
Mr. Dabir as far as my knowledge is concerned such media oriented names are of premium category and may seek higher value. I was acquainted with discussions going on regarding primarily hindi language entertainment platform called http://hindi.media and the dealing was of higher end hence expect it to be in several thousands bucks. Any inferior expectation may beget only disappointment.
Prospective buyers can contact domain holders directly in cases where the desired domain is no longer available. Most registries openly publish the names and contact data of domain holders. Once this information is gained, buyers can get in touch with domain holders and make them an offer for the name. Sales are also known to occur even when the original domain owner may necessarily have never had any prior commercial ambitions
By default we show the following metrics - Age, Ahrefs Domain Rating, Moz Domain Authority, Moz Page Authority, Moz Trust, Majestic Seo Trust and Citation Flow, Alexa Rank, Moz Referring Domains, Majestic Seo Referring Domains, Open PageRank, SimilarWeb Rank, SEMrush Monthly Traffic and Domain Price. Apart from these there are around 40+ metrics that you can see by customizing columns
However, I'd argue that most people in the business really struggle as they don't understand what makes a good domain name and what's a bad domain name. While I do not work in this field full-time, I can say that I can make a living of it, but it's probably because I don't ask for absurd prices (e.g. randomword247.com domain name for $8000 is just unrealistic and won't happen) and therefore can sell domains easier. 
There is always a learning curve in buying domains with the purpose of reselling them. Don’t hesitate to ask a lot of questions to those who went before you, participate in forums such as namepros.com and dnforum.com, keep abreast of industry trends via resources like domaining.com, and reach out to the Afternic and GoDaddy Aftermarket support teams.
That said, my recommended budget for beginners would be $500+. Using this budget you could buy a bunch of high-potential $10 domain names, expired/dropped domain names or a mix of both. It’s very important to invest only what you can afford to lose and treat this as a side hustle till you get the momentum going. As you gain experience, industry expertise and some sales under your belt, you can then consider slowly growing your business into a full-time gig.
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