The third option is the one that's the most time consuming but also has its benefits. It's like having a successful restaurant and buying another restaurant and operating them simultaneously. They're not the exact same restaurant, but both are popular in their own right and make you money. The same goes for Option #3. You could update the content on the old domain and sell the same products that you're selling on your current site. If you can get both sites to rank alongside each other in the SERPs, you're increasing your conversion chances and sales potential.

In today's SEO (2015) the answer would be a big no! With changes to the google algorithm and the constant updates panda, penguin, what's next...., much of the "keyword url" power is now gone. While there was a day when it made sense to buy a good named .com and expect instant indexing, not so anymore unless the site is very strong coming in ,which in that case you'll drop a minimum $50k. If you are willing to drop that kind of money and the site has a high domain authority, it might make sense as long as it matches whatever product or service that you're trying to sell. Just my opinion...


Also, Sedo.com, makes millions a week selling domains,even in the past week[3]! If you want to sell here, I would probably use a paid category or featured listings, one of my category listings, got 44 views in just 1 week but still waiting for a sale this month, hopefully. I would not really on this as a business, unless you add web development to it, and also, be sure to check that you are making a good profit, say within 6 months!
To join, you’ll need to purchase an annual GoDaddy Auctions membership for $4.99 a year. Once you’ve purchased a membership, you can take advantage of member benefits such as our Auctions Tools, which can help you prepare before buying or selling any domains. After joining the auction community, you’ll quickly learn how to navigate the world of domain buying and selling and can begin to make money by investing in domain names.

So, you paste the domain into here and click on the search domains button. This will show you more information about the pending delete status domain. In this case, you have to order by June 13th and today is the 10th. So, you have three days and you just add it to your cart as if you’re just buying anything online. Just check it off and click add to cart. It’s added to your cart and they will try to get it on your behalf.


Premium Domain names are domains that are already registered, but are available for sale at a higher price. Sometimes it will be an individual selling the domain, or it could be the domain registry (Like Donuts Inc. or Radix) selling their top quality inventory at a higher price point. These domains can be priced anywhere from a couple extra bucks to millions, depending on the domain name, the level of interest, or the amount of traffic it organically receives.
  Since starting SEO back in 2009, it has become very difficult to rank brand new domains. Unless you are building a brand, it's highly recommended that you start every new money site with an expired domain. Additionally, if you're building a PBN, you should only consider using expired domains. The problem is good domains start at $50 a piece, and anyone charging less is either full of sh*t or selling garbage domains, and I mean that. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. DomCop has a great offer that all of you buying expired domains should consider. For the price of a couple domain names, you can use DomCop for a month, snag some excellent domain names, which would otherwise cost you thousands of dollars. If you're considering expired domain software and don't have the knowledge to program your own crawler, I'd lean towards DomCop.   
Selecting a profitable niche is very important when it comes to domain flipping. Having adequate knowledge in searching domain names is critical. It will help you with fishing as well as parking domain names. Carving out a niche for yourself will enable you to seek out prospective buyers actively who would be interested in the domain names you are offering.
Whether you can use an existing backlink profile for a new web project under the available domain depends on whether the link target of incoming links can be reconstructed. In order to analyze which content was provided under a domain in the past, you can find out on the Internet Archive Backlinks have no value if they lead to nowhere and this can even have a negative impact. They are possibly redirected to similar subpages or homepages using 301 redirect. In this case the most part of the link’s power is lost.
Adding domains to our Premium Listings on our website before you sell will give them more exposure to the community. We’ll offer an appraisal for your domain to give you an estimated selling price, and you can adjust that price at any time. We also offer a comprehensive breakdown of our commission rates for all premium listings, so you can easily understand the process.
Domain name expert Bill Sweetman has provided strategic domain name advice to major companies around the world for over 20 years. Bill is the President & Lead Ninja of Name Ninja, a boutique domain name consulting firm that helps companies acquire, manage, protect, and profit from their domain names. A self-confessed domain name fanatic, Bill registered his very first domain in 1994 (which he later sold for five figures) and has been perfecting his “Domain Karate” moves ever since.

These should be more than enough to get your domain in front of tons of potential buyers. If you did a good job picking an awesome domain, you should have no problem (eventually) selling it. You need to be very patient as it could take months or even more to land a decent deal. A lot of domainers sit on domains for years before actually selling them. This is why it’s best not to obsess over a domain and simply move on with buying and listing others (or going back to your day job if this is a side gig) once you've listed the initial one.

Buying domains or registering domains–what’s the difference? There are many ways to acquire a domain. While available domains can be registered with any domain provider, rights of use from already-registered domains have to be purchased from their current owners. You can find different market places and auction platforms online that are tailored to these purposes. This kind of domain trade is...


In today's SEO (2015) the answer would be a big no! With changes to the google algorithm and the constant updates panda, penguin, what's next...., much of the "keyword url" power is now gone. While there was a day when it made sense to buy a good named .com and expect instant indexing, not so anymore unless the site is very strong coming in ,which in that case you'll drop a minimum $50k. If you are willing to drop that kind of money and the site has a high domain authority, it might make sense as long as it matches whatever product or service that you're trying to sell. Just my opinion... 

When you backorder the domain it will say how long you have to place your bid in. Let’s say it says 25 days. If the domain is from one of Namejet’s partners then the auction will start in 2-3 days. If this is an expiring domain and Namejet has to catch it there is a chance they won’t catch it in which case it won’t go to auction at Namejet. If they do catch it then 2-3 days before the auction starts.
Since 2013, more than 183 million domain names have been registered but none of these is used. A large chunk of these domain names is hoarded by domain flippers who will then resell these domain names to new buyers. Now if you are a newbie in this particular field, the best way to go about flipping domains is to start with a small budget until you gain relevant experience in the field.
The domain name industry is quite similar to the real estate industry in a lot of aspects. There are end users, brokers, consultants and domain flippers or “domainers”. Domain flipping works similarly to buying a house, renovating it (or even sometimes just sitting on it) and then selling it again at a higher price point. The gist of it is: you’re purchasing a domain name and betting it’s worth (or will be worth) more than you paid for it. If you’re right, you get a nice paycheck and move on. Those who make a living out of this just rinse, repeat, and scale.
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