Please keep in mind that domain flipping isn’t child’s play. As much as you may want, it isn’t easy to buy and sell domain names for huge profits without putting in a good amount of time and effort. Although there’s nothing wrong in aspiring for at least one big deal per month, be aware that sometimes it takes months and months to sell just a single domain name.
If you don’t have a lot of money to invest in employees and you’d rather work on your domain portfolio by yourself, you’d need plenty of free time. Generally, mini sites with 5 to 10 pages of content can be built within 5 days, while authority sites with over 10 pages could take up to two weeks. This amount of time would depend on your writing skills and knowledge of SEO techniques.
Your course of action really depends on how much work and effort you can put into the expired domain. If you're barely able to maintain and optimize your current site, you probably want to just 301 redirect the old site (note: see my amended comment above about the link value not likely to be passed). If, however, you're more creative and have some time on your hands, you can try your hand at crafting a microsite. If you really know your stuff and are experienced at making money off various websites, you'd probably do well with the third option. 

Many top-level domains, or TLDs, out there have the potential of being sold at top dollar rates. Gone are the days when domain names with ‘.COM’, ‘.ORG’ and ‘.NET’ were known as top-level domains. Newer domain names with ‘.US’ and ‘.IO’ are also worth their weight in gold. All you have to do is conduct thorough research in order to find all the good domain names you can park.
GoDaddy’s domain auction space serves as a “marketplace” for buyers and sellers to get together and make deals. When a domain expires, it typically goes right back to the registry. If it’s a valuable domain name, however, registrars will try to sell it through auction, and buyers are always eager to capitalize on potential deals. Participating in a domain auction can be a nuanced business, so take a look at our Auctions FAQ page for more details on the process.
I've seen some people comment about losing the link value of domains that have expired and picked up, but what about non-expired domains?  Let's say a competitor is going out of business and they still have a year or two left, and we buy their domain and site.  Is there a risk changing registrant info and registrars, even if I keep their site up and mostly the same as before?  I was under the impression that I'd want to keep it under their name so as not to hit the uber-reset button on the domain's inbound link value.

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If domains are real estate, then the same rules of real estate should apply. In real estate, taxes are based on the value of the property. So, a person asking $10,000 for a domain shouldn't be paying the standard $15-30 renewal fee as a person asking $200. The renewal fee should be based on the domain's value. Domainers want to claim it's like real estate without applying the most fundamental rules of real estate.
Similarly, for adult items which are theme based you go for similar domain names that are suitable for such businesses. Like for bridal cakes for bachelorette we need to wish them luck sop for a bachelorette cakes and other party items site the names can be like http://www.luckonluck.com. Though somewhat it could be suitable also for book making sites. But better luck is needed to a bride after all and for HEN parties ladies need luck.
What about option #4 - Redirect your existing domain to the old domain? I bought an old domain that is 100% relevant to my current domain but currently has with very little content. It did have more content fours years ago. The old domain is 13 years old, pr=3, while my current is 7 months old pr=1 and a decent amount of content. The old domain I purchased was not expired though and I do not know if this makes a difference. What are the pros and cons of option #4? Am I correct to think that option #1 would result in no benefit from the old domain's age value and if so why is it not listed as a con, a MAJOR one. Its hard to believe that a 301 using option 1 would give my existing domain 13 years credit but I'll take it if it does.
If you are feeling ambitious, you can link each of your domain names to its matching “buy it now” purchase page at one of the marketplaces. Another more sophisticated option would be to “park” your domain with one of the leading domain parking companies, such as DomainSponsor or SmartName and enable their built-in “for sale” message and contact mechanisms.
Your domain name registrar may provide you with a free one-page Website tool, which you can use to create a “this domain is for sale” landing page. Alternatively, you can create a single page (perhaps a hidden page hanging off one of your existing websites) that indicates that your domain names are for sale. You can then forward all of your domain names that are for sale to that one page.
That said, my recommended budget for beginners would be $500+. Using this budget you could buy a bunch of high-potential $10 domain names, expired/dropped domain names or a mix of both. It’s very important to invest only what you can afford to lose and treat this as a side hustle till you get the momentum going. As you gain experience, industry expertise and some sales under your belt, you can then consider slowly growing your business into a full-time gig.
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