Hi, I’m Mark! I’ve been an online entrepreneur, writer, website flipper and more for over 8 years now. Having faced the highs and lows of the online marketplace first-hand, I’ve learned quite a few things along the way. I’d love to share all those learnings with you here on this blog! Buying/selling websites can be great fun, provided you’re aware of the right tactics and know how to implement them correctly. My posts will help you do just that!
That’s it for deleted domains which you can just pick up by heading over to your favorite registrar and registering it right away as long as it says, free and green here. If it says registered it’s obviously taken. This is obviously a cheap way to get some great links because let’s say, you know, this site we saw is not bad. It doesn’t have page rank, but that could be just because there was no content on the site. If it has a solid link profile, you can be sure that the page rank will come back and you can pick it up for about $10.
What DomCop does for you, is show you a list of all these domains along with important metrics for every domain. These metrics, along with our powerful filtering and sorting capabilities, will help reduce the size of the daily list from 200,000+ to just a handful of the very best domains. What would take you hours, will now literally take you seconds to do.
Keyword relevancy is not the only thing that matters when it comes to SEO. However, domain names that were previously used by other businesses usually have a lot of backlinks and a decent ranking on PageRank. Even though such domain names are usually about to expire, they are still worth a lot of money if they have a good number of backlinks and a ranking of five or more.
Thanks for this post. I do good with Adsense and wanted to branch out so I bought 5 domains from Namejet after reading this thread. After the 5 auctions ended I spent $500 total. I contacted 30 people about these domains and after a few bites I was able to sell one of them for $500 so I got my money back and now what I sell the other four for is all profit. The best part about this is that it is not very time consuming. I spent maybe an hour on Namejet. I spent maybe two hours sending out emails. Thanks again!
If you are looking to monetize an idle domain, looking to third-party platforms would be a good idea. Many of these platforms such as Nameforest ourselves will create a logo alongside your domain, which will be added to the list of preexisting domains on their sites. This is useful as the demand for your domain will also be greatly increased after it is rented as opposed to a domain that leads to a blank site - thus making it easier for you to find a potential buyer.
Once you decide to sell a domain name, it is important to find the best market to sell it. The best way to sell a domain name is to approach buyers secretly. If you know someone who deals with domain names, it is recommended to contact him without going through the middleman. Chances are that the seller will make more profit, as he will not have to pay the middleman.
Really depends on whether you want it to be passively marketed or actively pitched to investors and buyers, as well as how fast you want it sold. It also depends on what you're selling. What you're selling is only worth ANYTHING if there is an interested buyer. And it's only worth what the buyer is willing to pay for it at the time you want to sell it, not what you currently owe on your RV. This is a common misperception among folks trying to value domains before sale - they pick some nebulous method of pricing it that is not based on the market or history or sector demand, but rather on what a vacation costs or how much they owe on their boat. Good luck with that. So it really depends. If you have something that you feel has demand, you'll potentially get a higher price for it by NOT needing to short sell it quickly for cash and being able to wait while a broker packages and pitches it. 60-90 days. That will always get a higher price than just listing it in a database and hoping someone will see it and be interested. The problem is, good brokers are few and you're going to need to see if they will represent you in the sale. If they don't believe they can sell it at all, or they don't believe they can sell it for what you owe on your boat, they'll decline your offer to do business with you because you're being unrealistic.
The easiest way to see that is to go to HREFs and look at the anchor text. It reveals right away whether or not the site has been spammed. You also want to see if it’s been SEO’d too much. Right? In this case, it’s not because it has a brand name here and some natural keywords, but if the number one anchor text was like, cell phone management system and then the next one was like cheap cell phone management system, you’d know that the anchor text was manipulated and probably overly SEO’d. So, what you want as a site that has a natural link profile.
The truth is that you require at least one year’s time to get around only the basics of the domain flipping business, leave alone making huge money from it. During this time, you’ll make several mistakes, buy useless domain names, lose out prospective deals and much more. Domain flipping is far from any get rich quick method. If overnight results are what you’re after, domain investing may not be your piece of cake. This business involves a real and steep learning curve which many people find difficult to climb.
Your course of action really depends on how much work and effort you can put into the expired domain. If you're barely able to maintain and optimize your current site, you probably want to just 301 redirect the old site (note: see my amended comment above about the link value not likely to be passed). If, however, you're more creative and have some time on your hands, you can try your hand at crafting a microsite. If you really know your stuff and are experienced at making money off various websites, you'd probably do well with the third option.
Think about things like contractor.com or oranges.com. The more generic you go, the better off you will be. Why? Research has shown that Google likes generic names, so any company selling oranges may, for example, want the oranges.com domain name. If you own that name, you can set the asking price for it. Sounds great, right? There arejust a few things you have to think about first.
I’m ready to purchase domain hunter gatherer after seeing your video but I’m a little scared to spend money because all I need is information for South Africa and the Domains that expire for .co.za if you can do a quick check (not a long as the video ) on the features it has for .co.za and let me know id show my appreciation by purchasing immediately as this is my only concern.
With over 25 million .com domains registered with Google alone, this top-level domain is by far the most popular choice worldwide. According to the domain marketplace Sedo, in 2015 the average sales price for a .com domain name was over £3000. The most expensive publicly traded domain names have been known to fetch eight-figures sums. But don’t quit your day job just yet: such sales are the exception rather than the rule.

You can’t tell us (with a straight face) that aged dictionary word .net and .org domains won’t sell easily. The .net extension is technically OLDER than .com, and holds an equally intrinsic value to that of its .com counterpart. These LLLL .com’s that are just letters slapped together may be cute to look at and easy to sell, but in the eyes of Google, ANY aged domain that makes sense (i.e. a dictionary word) is going to be much easier to rank for than some acronym or hodgepodge .com…and at the end of the day, that holds more value than whatever society sees in these nonsensical “wqij.com” names.
Link popularity: the link popularity is a parameter that is used to quantitatively evaluate incoming links to a website. This is measured depending on the number of links to a domain according to the mantra 'the more incoming links, the more important the site'. Link popularity is generally determined by the PageRank algorithm. The PageRank only plays a minor role in determining the domain’s relevance.
This is a little bit on the grey hat/black hat side of the spectrum. But the fact is building a blog network with expired domains flat out works. The only issue is getting those cream of the crop domains without going broke. This video will walk you through tested strategies and techniques you can use to find powerful, yet affordable, expired domains.
Domain names expire when someone decides to stop renewing it. They may not be available to register immediately. We update the search index every night, so some names may already be renewed or re-registered. Some may become available in a few days. Some registrars, like GoDaddy, will let you buy a name that one of their own customers expire immediately. When you find a name you like, just click on it to try backordering the name!
Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying marketing your domain is not important. But, if you’ve bought a bad domain and you do (and overdo) everything laid out in this section and more, it’s still very unlikely that it would sell. It’s like spending car flipping and spending a huge amount of money, time and effort perfecting a car’s paint job, except that this car’s engine is completely fried. You’ll never be able to drive it anyway, no matter how awesome the paint job is, it’s irrelevant.

In the grey hat SEO world, the thought is that you can take a domain that is keyword driven, do a quick optimization to get the site ranking, and sell it off at a profit. It could, and does happen daily. How much time is invested in optimizing a site to get to page one, vs how much the site will sell for? (remember that quote at the beginning of this article?). Let's put it into simple math:
No, no, no. ToysRUs made a perfectly logical decison that most any business would do and Google tanked them for it. ToysRUs wanted the url toys.com to direct to their site.  They're all about toys and they simply bought a url that described their business and told the url where to take people.  Google tanked them in the rankings because Toys.com came with link juice. Google assumed that Toys.com was doing this to manipulate the search engines but there is just, to my knowledge, ZERO evidence of this.  This is another case of Google caring more about the possible spam threat than the actual rankings for searchers.
Just like a property listing, except much simpler, domain marketplaces are basically massive lists of domain names that are up for sale. The process of using them is simple. Buy a domain and park it, then list your domain on the marketplace for a price you’re willing to let it go for. Once the domain is sold, the marketplace takes a cut and then passes on the remaining funds to you.
Internet users, who try to find expired domains and re-register them, will soon discover that this plan cannot be manually accomplished. Professional domain traders are familiar with the registry deletion process and rely on sophisticated algorithms that indicate when a domain is about to become available. Deletion lists are the result of this research. You can find many datasets online with domains that have already become available or will soon be. You often have to pay to be able to see this information.
Each of the third parties we integrate with charge for getting metrics for a domain. DomCop pays for their API to get this data for you and therefore you do not need to purchase additional accounts to get these metrics. One DomCop account will do it all. As new players enter the market, we integrate with them so that you always have the best and most comprehensive set of metrics to help you decide which domain to buy.
If the third party in question does not have the trademark rights they claim, or it is not a very strong claim. In most cases, the third party will need their trademark registered with the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). The USPTO website has a trademark search engine that you can consult. This may also require a cybersquatting attorney to help determine if the trademark claim is strong enough.
Thanks for this post. I do good with Adsense and wanted to branch out so I bought 5 domains from Namejet after reading this thread. After the 5 auctions ended I spent $500 total. I contacted 30 people about these domains and after a few bites I was able to sell one of them for $500 so I got my money back and now what I sell the other four for is all profit. The best part about this is that it is not very time consuming. I spent maybe an hour on Namejet. I spent maybe two hours sending out emails. Thanks again!
Your system is broken, You took my lising money on an open domain http://www.australianfintech.com.au and then stuffed me around something cronic and no response from your supoport team either. I have spoken to Tony who is one of the main people there at a function and I will move heaven and earth to find his number and give him a piece of my mind!! I have 60+ domains to sell but it seems you do not want the business! BAD MOVE not accomodating clients!
As you can see just within expired domains they have over two million deleted .com domains. Now, this is obviously overwhelming if you’re trying to look for domains. So, you should use a few filters to make the search process a lot easier. To do that, click on the search filter button. Down here I like to click on the Only With A DMAS Entry because that just filters out sites that are really spammy. For sites that that have been in DMAS ever, it means that the site had to be of some quality.

Justifiably, any attribute or factor that is known to be influencing prices, is doing so as it leads to demand. On how easy basis of such factor demand is raised and thus the price. Hence, these domains of media like segments as you say like http://www.hindi.media gain worth from the same factors that lead to demand. When price is enhanced or goes premium, the domains are thus known as premium domains.


Instead of focusing on one domain name to sell quickly, try selling large volumes of domain names over longer periods of time. While this may require a more substantial investment, it will also return a greater profit in the long term. Remember, if you follow the basic principles of domain name speculation, there is good chance that your domain names will sell eventually.
Yandex replaced TCI with SQI (Site Quality Index). SQI looks similar to TCI, so I re-used the old TCI field, however all values are now the new SQI. Not all domains are checked yet, but all that had TCI > 0, are now switched to SQI and all newly added domains are also checked for SQI (starting today). Updating all domains will take a couple months.
We do not only have Expired Domains, but you can also find lists of Deleted Domains for a lot of TLDs. Deleted Domains or Dropped Domains are available for registration and can be picked up for just the normal regfee at your preferred domain registrar! All Domains have the typical SEO relevant data, like Number of Backlinks, Archive.org Birth Date and a lot more.

While buying up a ton of domains seems like a great way to make some extra money, the real world results show that it is very hard to make that process profitable. As with any industry, you will have those "golden moments" when someone you read about made it into a million dollar a year business, all while sitting in the comfort of his own home. That could be true, but he probably consumed a lot of alcohol and lost a lot of hair doing it.

With over 25 million .com domains registered with Google alone, this top-level domain is by far the most popular choice worldwide. According to the domain marketplace Sedo, in 2015 the average sales price for a .com domain name was over £3000. The most expensive publicly traded domain names have been known to fetch eight-figures sums. But don’t quit your day job just yet: such sales are the exception rather than the rule.
When you are selling a domain name, you don’t want to suffer because of failed transactions or being tricked by defaulters. Safeguard your monetary dealings; the best way to do this is to take the help of a secure domain transfer and escrow service. The escrow system is highly beneficial because a buyer has to deposit money at the trusted source prior to purchase, and the dealing between a buyer and a seller takes place through a secure domain transfer and escrow service. This makes the transaction safer for both parties with the involvement of a neutral third party.
Ur article is good but the problem is Flippas RESERVE PRICE and STart PRice are Ridiculous conflicting features.. which means sellers have no freedom to choose a good price.. But flippa gets its $10 even if seller makes $5. How shameless is this platform. Also, flippa is using a thirdparty brandable API for escrow, which allows them to charge ANY AMOUNT for escrow fee, and they are charing $25 in the name of third party. Serously flippa is a bunch of crooks
Just because something is legal does not make it ethical. While things that are legal can and often are ethical, there are practices like domain name flipping that are not ethical. Buying a domain name without intending to use it to make profit creates an unnecessary industry which costs people money and reduces general productivity and economic growth. This is the same with all practices that cost people money but do not contribute any value, most notably corruption. If we eliminated such practices our economic growth increases and general wealth is increased because our money is paying people for things that add to our lives and our communities. This does not. Evessariky reglect badly in people who choose to engage in such practices, but is a result of regulatory failure.
Most domains traders, or resellers, buy hundreds of domain names. This way, the chances of hitting the jackpot are higher. But, this takes some up front money. You can start with a handful of names and work your way up. This is the best way to begin. You may also decide to purchase a name from another seller if you think that a name will be big enough.
This ebook is the ONLY book you need to read if you want to get into the domain name flipping game. This ebook is a step by step guide on how to get into this very lucrative online business. From picking domain names, to finding out their value, to registering them, putting them on auction sites and eventually selling them, this book takes you by the hand and walks you through the process step by step. This book gives you the websites to go to and everything! Very informative guide!
Current Craze: When PokémonGo was HUGE last year, my domain flipping friends (Matt of Handshakin.com is one) were all about buying domains like PokeStopNearMe(.com) and other related domains associated with the PokémonGo craziness. It’s like the day trading of the domain world. You’re buying domains during the hype and hope to sell them for a higher price quickly before the hype fades.
Also with the domains, a name which can be cheap for one can be worth gold for the other. Permute the letters in your domain name and try contacting and eventually selling out to organizations that run under those names or contain the letters within. Companies would be keenly interested in buying out the domain names that matches the product's name. Hint : Look for companies on LinkedIn
Domain name expert Bill Sweetman has provided strategic domain name advice to major companies around the world for over 20 years. Bill is the President & Lead Ninja of Name Ninja, a boutique domain name consulting firm that helps companies acquire, manage, protect, and profit from their domain names. A self-confessed domain name fanatic, Bill registered his very first domain in 1994 (which he later sold for five figures) and has been perfecting his “Domain Karate” moves ever since.
While numbers like the ones seen above are impressive, most domains sell for significantly less extravagant prices and are generally in the two or three-digit range. Not long ago, those who were able to secure general terms (like icecream.com or pizza.com) not protected by trademark rights often found themselves sitting on virtual gold mines. The glory days of this boom have long since passed, and those looking for a profit in today’s market need a keen sense for coming trends.
ExpiredDomains.net gathers all the information you need to find good Expired Domains that are Pending Delete and you can Backorder. Depending on the domain extension you can search through thousands of domains every day before they get released to the public and pick what you like. ExpiredDomains.net currently supports 449 TLDs. From the classic gTLDs like .com, .net, .org to Droplists for ccTLDs you can only find here and now we even support some of the best new gTLDs like .xyz and .club.
For the following TLDs you can now find a expired/deleted domain list. .gi, .gl, .gy, .hn, .ht, .ky, .mu, .om, .pf, .qa, .rw, .sb, .sm, .sn, .st, .sx, .tc, .tl, .ug, .uy They also show up in the Deleted Domains (last 7 days) list and in the Domain Name Search, however they are not in the pending delete list! I do not have a working droplist for them yet, so that is why they are not released in the pending delete list yet.
A rule of thumb that I follow is when I purchase a domain name I have to believe that I can flip it for a 100% profit.  So if I spend $500 on a domain I need to feel like I can sell it for no less than $1,000.  This way, even if I’m wrong in my estimation I still have some room to still turn a profit.  And if worse case comes to worse case I’ve sold domains before for a $0 profit (it happens even to the best of us).
Using the keyword search feature you’d also be able to familiarize yourself with how much domains typically cost on average in a certain industry or niche. Even better, they have an addictive little app called “The Domain Game” available for iOS and Android. They basically give you a domain and you try to guess whether it sold for three, four, five or six figures. You get points for each correct answer and lose points for incorrect ones. You do this for a while and you start to see patterns. Your brain starts connecting the dots and you get better it. Now you’re ready to go out there and scout some domains!
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