Listing on domain marketplaces: This is the most common route. You should, however, acquaint yourself with each marketplace’s policies and fees before deciding to work with them. For example, Sedo’s commission starts at 10% and BrandBucket prohibits listing the domain anywhere else if you’re selling with them. Here’s a list of the most popular marketplaces (in no particular order):
Check backlink profile: If you’re not familiar with what backlinks are, they’re basically any public website that “links” to the domain in question. Since there are numerous shady tactics in the SEO world, expired domains’ backlink profiles should be examined carefully. Check if too many links are coming from the same domain or if links have weird anchor texts/use foreign languages. You can use a tool such as ahrefs for these purposes.
A rule of thumb that I follow is when I purchase a domain name I have to believe that I can flip it for a 100% profit.  So if I spend $500 on a domain I need to feel like I can sell it for no less than $1,000.  This way, even if I’m wrong in my estimation I still have some room to still turn a profit.  And if worse case comes to worse case I’ve sold domains before for a $0 profit (it happens even to the best of us).

The first is the link profile I and actually took this example carbondsystems.com because it looked like a pretty good choice. It’s from 2003. It has some links, some age and it’s in DMAS and looked at the link profile in DMAS. So, you just copy and paste the domain,  the home page it to here, click on the search links button and this will show you all the links to that site.


While buying up a ton of domains seems like a great way to make some extra money, the real world results show that it is very hard to make that process profitable. As with any industry, you will have those "golden moments" when someone you read about made it into a million dollar a year business, all while sitting in the comfort of his own home. That could be true, but he probably consumed a lot of alcohol and lost a lot of hair doing it.
The first thing you need to do is signup at Namejet in order to get your account (signup is free).  You can then use their search functionality to sort through all the upcoming domains for auction.  Place bids for $69 on the ones you want to go to auction for.  If you bid on 100 different domains for $69 each, and there is 50 bidders for each auction you need to understand you aren’t going to owe any money, you are not committing $6,900 to Namejet.  By entering that $69 you are getting an entry into the live bidding when the 30 days expire.  Only if you are the ONLY bidder on a domain would you automatically win the domain and owe $69 to Namejet.

Also, Sedo.com, makes millions a week selling domains,even in the past week[3]! If you want to sell here, I would probably use a paid category or featured listings, one of my category listings, got 44 views in just 1 week but still waiting for a sale this month, hopefully. I would not really on this as a business, unless you add web development to it, and also, be sure to check that you are making a good profit, say within 6 months!
I am really new to all this. I am about to launch my blog in the next week. I have a domain and a wordpress blog set ready to go. Clearly it will have no traffic from day one and I guess it will take a while to build up. So my question is would you advise a begginer like me to stick with the one blog for a while and build it up. Or is it worth investing the time early on to master how to find expired domains and link them to the blog?
The "Domain Lists" and the "TLDs" filter are now static and not created dynamic based on the current search. Turns out creating these 2 filters dynamically was slowing down the search tremendously. It even made certain requests impossible. For example now you can do a dot search that affects all .com domains and get a result with over 150mio domains in reasonable time. I'm also working on a new search cluster that will make searching even faster (not released yet).

Expired domains are especially attractive due to key SEO factors that are primarily associated with an existing backlink profile. If you are considering buying an expired domain, you can determine the quality of it by looking at the inbound links. When it comes to assessing the value of an expired domain relevant keywords contained in the second-level domain, a possible reference to products, brands, or services are all useful.
Expired domains are domains that have been registered by individuals, businesses, or organizations, but aren’t renewed after the contract ends, or are deliberately terminated. That means that they available for re-registration. There are many reasons why someone would choose to abandon a domain; one reason could be that the web project failed, or that a domain portfolio went into liquidization. Domains can also end up becoming free due to the owner receiving warnings for possible trademark infringement. Re-registering can also result in legal consequences.
There are several types of domain names to avoid. One is intentional misspellings, as these make it less likely someone will search for them. You also want to avoid names with extra symbols like hyphens, or with added prefixes and suffixes like "e" or "my." Outside of a few notable exceptions with very strong brands (like eBay), those additions can only hurt the value.[3]
Dictionary Word/Pronounceable/Memorable/Brandable: A dictionary word domain name is very valuable. Of course, the more popular and widely used the word is, the better. For example, “marketing.com”, “cars.com” and “hotels.com” are 7-8 figure domain names. Even if a domain name isn’t a dictionary word, being pronounceable and/or memorable and/or brandable are all big pluses that add to its value.
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