Simply put, domain flipping is the process of acquiring a domain name with a motive of selling it at a higher cost to someone else. This is very similar to flipping houses or cars, the only difference being that you can’t do much to increase the value of the asset by ‘fixing it up’ and then turning it over for a quick buck. Acquiring a valuable domain name before it is tagged with a premium price is the key to a successful domain flip. Raymond Hackney, a domain investor and consultant, successfully flipped a .website domain (his first on a new domain extension) for a decent profit. Read all about it here.
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I founded this site back in 2007. I lost $50 to a data entry scam when I was still in college. I felt ripped off and had no recourse, but to suck it up and pull an extra shift delivering food to make ends meet.I setup this site so no one would have to go through the same experience I went through. I wanted to stop scam artists from preying on the vulnerable and help regular people learn the true, legitimate ways of making money online.

Adam Strong Ali Zandi Ammar Kubba Andrew Allemann Andrew Rosener buy domains cybersquatting domain name investing domain name parking domain name review domain name sales domain name valuation Efty.com EMD Escrow.com Estibot.com exact match domain Founders Frank Schilling GAKT geo-domains Giuseppe Graziano Go Daddy GoDaddy.com Google ICANN lead generation Michael Berkens Michael Cyger Moniker NameJet.com NamesCon.com negotiation new gTLDs Page Howe registrar Ron Jackson Sedo Sedo.com sell domains seo Shane Cultra trademark UDRP valuation
The market-driven principles of the domain trade mean that a domain is only worth as much as the buyer is willing to pay. It is for this reason that criteria such as market potential and usability play such central roles in determining prices. Values can change at the drop of a hat. The price of a domain that was once of little interest to anyone in years past can skyrocket once, for example, a newly founded company takes interest in that same name.
The first is the link profile I and actually took this example carbondsystems.com because it looked like a pretty good choice. It’s from 2003. It has some links, some age and it’s in DMAS and looked at the link profile in DMAS. So, you just copy and paste the domain,  the home page it to here, click on the search links button and this will show you all the links to that site.
The market-driven principles of the domain trade mean that a domain is only worth as much as the buyer is willing to pay. It is for this reason that criteria such as market potential and usability play such central roles in determining prices. Values can change at the drop of a hat. The price of a domain that was once of little interest to anyone in years past can skyrocket once, for example, a newly founded company takes interest in that same name.

Everybody going to start using old domains should also know how to get them, I'm going to post soon article about it on seomoz as there are several ways starting from online rankings and lists up to dedicated seo tools that you can run on your computer and get precise and actual data on demand for any domains lists. Anybody intersting in such tools please visit our website: http://en.exdomain.eu/
I recommend Go Daddy premium and Afternic. Once you get it listed at those two places then do a redirect so that anyone who types the URL goes to one of those two, for-sale pages. I would suggest a price of $500 to $2,000. You might get lucky and attract a buyer in the next year or two. After two years, if it doesn’t sell I would just stop renewing it.

If you’re serious about domain flipping, one of the best strategies is to buy expiring domains that auctioned on the market such as GoDaddy Auctions. Make sure you pick domain names that have good traffic, backlinks and SEO metrics, or domains with the generic niche. Expiring domains with a potential for profit can be found using BuycomDomain.com, this is a free website/tool that helps you sort through the domains by different metrics (age, traffic, backlinks, domain authority etc).
Hi guys, just a thought, you do not need to build traffic to the domain yourself, you can always buy expired domains, best to subscribe to a paid service like dropping.com (so you are the first to know) or a free one, expireddomains.net and in this way, you can get old domains that have traffic. You could use these domains for parking, getting advertising income or even to sell. I have noticed, that domains that were not hot in the past, can still be hot now, just use Google Trends to type in the keyword, and you will see its future projections. 

Use the advanced search option to quickly hone in on the type of names you are interested in. You can narrow the results by price, top-level domain (i.e, .com, .net, .org, .club, etc.), keyword, and many more filters. Using this feature will help you quickly sort through the millions of domains on the aftermarket and find the domain names that best fit your end goals.
Just because something is legal does not make it ethical. While things that are legal can and often are ethical, there are practices like domain name flipping that are not ethical. Buying a domain name without intending to use it to make profit creates an unnecessary industry which costs people money and reduces general productivity and economic growth. This is the same with all practices that cost people money but do not contribute any value, most notably corruption. If we eliminated such practices our economic growth increases and general wealth is increased because our money is paying people for things that add to our lives and our communities. This does not. Evessariky reglect badly in people who choose to engage in such practices, but is a result of regulatory failure.
Park the domain with a domain parking service. Since you may not have content to put on the site, a parking service puts up a dummy page with ads. When people visit and click on the ads, that's money for you. This method works best with popular keyword domains that get lots of traffic. In most cases, you will not have control over what ads appear on your domains.[5]
In today's SEO (2015) the answer would be a big no! With changes to the google algorithm and the constant updates panda, penguin, what's next...., much of the "keyword url" power is now gone. While there was a day when it made sense to buy a good named .com and expect instant indexing, not so anymore unless the site is very strong coming in ,which in that case you'll drop a minimum $50k. If you are willing to drop that kind of money and the site has a high domain authority, it might make sense as long as it matches whatever product or service that you're trying to sell. Just my opinion...
Domain names expire when someone decides to stop renewing it. They may not be available to register immediately. We update the search index every night, so some names may already be renewed or re-registered. Some may become available in a few days. Some registrars, like GoDaddy, will let you buy a name that one of their own customers expire immediately. When you find a name you like, just click on it to try backordering the name!

As far as flipping domains for a profit is concerned, there are certain domain names that are worth a lot of money. For instance, Hotel.com and Business.com have been reportedly sold for $11 million and $7 million respectively. Now even though coming across such golden domain names seems more like a long shot, you can still make a decent amount of money if you choose to buy and sell domains as a part-time business opportunity.
Internet users, who try to find expired domains and re-register them, will soon discover that this plan cannot be manually accomplished. Professional domain traders are familiar with the registry deletion process and rely on sophisticated algorithms that indicate when a domain is about to become available. Deletion lists are the result of this research. You can find many datasets online with domains that have already become available or will soon be. You often have to pay to be able to see this information.
That’s it for deleted domains which you can just pick up by heading over to your favorite registrar and registering it right away as long as it says, free and green here. If it says registered it’s obviously taken. This is obviously a cheap way to get some great links because let’s say, you know, this site we saw is not bad. It doesn’t have page rank, but that could be just because there was no content on the site. If it has a solid link profile, you can be sure that the page rank will come back and you can pick it up for about $10.
When a domain name that was previously registered expires, it goes through a grace period that allows the previous registrant one last chance to reclaim their domain before it becomes available to new buyers. If the previous registrant still has not renewed their domain after the 77 day deletion process, the domain name will officially expire and enter the Aftermarket.
Contact Potential Buying Companies: With my domain IHateCold(.com) I will email the marketing teams of some of the large winter clothing companies and let them know of the available domain to buy and a few potential slogans they could use with the domain name. This is a very “I’m here to help you” scenario that I’m curious to see how it plays out. They’ll have to learn about the domain name for sale somehow, right?

When I first started online, I'd register domains that I thought I could develop and sell at a later time. After learning my way around the cloud, I realized many of the domains I'd registered are pretty much useless, or so I thought, and I let them expire. Come to find out several of these domains have been picked up by parking sites and are being offered for sale for thousands of dollars! Now I'm not saying they're actually selling for the asking price, but I learned my lesson. I never allow a domain name to expire. I add content to it, backlinks, some AdSense and try to sell it for something.
Right now there are over 656,000 expiring domains that you can pre-bid on at Namejet. Lots of opportunity there even if more people come. The key is to find those hidden gems and wait until 1 minute before they go off the board (assuming no one has bid on it yet) and then bid. This is the best way to attempt to be the only bidder on a domain and win it for $69.

Use escrow services for direct sales. When you are dealing directly with the buyer, make sure that any money that is transferred goes through an escrow service. This will ensure that all checks clear and that you aren't left with a bounced check and no domain. Escrow services may add a few days to a sale and cost you a percentage, but they can save you a lot of heartache.

However, I'd argue that most people in the business really struggle as they don't understand what makes a good domain name and what's a bad domain name. While I do not work in this field full-time, I can say that I can make a living of it, but it's probably because I don't ask for absurd prices (e.g. randomword247.com domain name for $8000 is just unrealistic and won't happen) and therefore can sell domains easier. 

Wait for people to contact me: When I bought my two domains, I didn’t pay the extra $12 for Domain Privacy, learn about Domain Privacy here, so anyone can look up the owner of IHateCold(.com) and ReallyFunnyJoke(.com) in the ICANN WHOIS Database. It can tell you whoever owns any website unless that domain owner pays for domain privacy. So if someone was really interested in any of my websites, they could look me up and shoot me an email about their interest.


I’m new to flipping domain. Like other newbie there are lots of questions that comes out to my mind. When I read your article, the first questions pops up to my mind is.. how to find the buyer for the domain? I have a lists of good domains that I keep. Actually, I have a .info name and the .com of its version is sold at afternic at $16,000. I never thought that the .com of my .info domain has sold that high. I heard lots of .info domain has been sold quite a little, now my problem is how do I sell my .info domain? I was left confused with domain marketplace like sedo, afternic, and others. I want my domain sold like others did on their .info domain. Has any of you can help me? Anyway, my domain was registered 2 – 3 weeks from now and domain is about selling ” ” online.
Prospective buyers can contact domain holders directly in cases where the desired domain is no longer available. Most registries openly publish the names and contact data of domain holders. Once this information is gained, buyers can get in touch with domain holders and make them an offer for the name. Sales are also known to occur even when the original domain owner may necessarily have never had any prior commercial ambitions
What is a domain? Despite this word being mentioned so frequently, it’s often unclear what the functions and structures of domains are. Knowing the hierarchical structure of the Domain Name System (DNS) is fundamental for anyone working in IT or in any online industry. We explain the difference between top-level, second-level, and third-level domains, and how you can benefit from subdomains that...
But in general, the best and easy way to sell a domain is to go with a marketplace. There is many popular marketplace dedicated to selling domains including Flippa and SellDom to sell your domain (full disclosure, I’m working on SellDom). The advantage is to leverage the popularity of that kinds of services in hope that someone will find your domain and buy/make an offer.
Official marketplaces offer a third possibility for domain traders to peddle their product. Domain marketplaces, such as Sedo, GoDaddy.com, or BuyDomains.com, link potential buyers with domain holders hoping to sell their prized virtual property. These platforms function as a kind of domain real estate agency and are known to demand somewhat high prices for their services.

Some buyers are a tough nut to crack and they may quote a ridiculously low offer. Explain to these buyers and convince them why the domain is worth more than the quote. If the potential buyer doesn’t agree, fret not, just move on to the next one until you find a willing buyer. Once you finalize the deal, then it’s time to find the best payment mode for the transaction.
This is similar to house flipping, where a home is purchased and fixed up in order to sell for a quick profit. Unlike house flipping, however, there is essentially nothing to be done with the domain name in order to increase its value. Therefore, the key to a successful domain flip is being in the right place at the right time in order to acquire a valuable domain name before it is given a premium price.
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